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    #1

    brew tea

    What do you do with tea when you pour hot water over tea leaves? You brew it in a small kettle or let it stand in it?

  1. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: brew tea

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    What do you do with tea when you pour hot water over tea leaves? You brew it in a small kettle or let it stand in it?
    The word is "steep".

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    #3

    Re: brew tea

    Quote Originally Posted by lauralie2 View Post
    The word is "steep".
    So you don't brew tea or stand it you only steep it?

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    #4

    Re: brew tea

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    So you don't brew tea or stand it you only steep it?
    In BrE we say "let the tea stand for ten minutes" or "let the tea brew for ten minutes".

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    #5

    Re: brew tea

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    In BrE we say "let the tea stand for ten minutes" or "let the tea brew for ten minutes".
    What about "to steep"?

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    #6

    Re: brew tea

    You pour boiling water from the kettle onto the tea leaves (or teabags) in the teapot (or mug) and let it brew.

    In BE we don't use 'steep'.

    Rover

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    #7

    Re: brew tea

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    What about "to steep"?
    I've never heard or used "steep" in connection with making tea.

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    #8

    Re: brew tea

    Tea Brewing Basics, How to Store Loose Teas, What is a tea sachet

    This American purveyor of fine teas uses "brewing" to describe making tea, and advises "steep times" for the various blends.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: brew tea

    I'm so surprised by this thread -- I would have bet money that "steep" was more common in the UK than in the US.

    It is, however, reasonably common in the US.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: brew tea

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I've never heard or used "steep" in connection with making tea.
    But the verb is OK in general for leaving things for a time in a liquid. And it's also used metaphorically to refer to an intellectual climate - 'steeped in the wisdom of the ancients' - sort of thing.

    The verb 'brew' correlates so strongly with tea that in some parts of the UK it's used informally as a noun (meaning 'cup/mug of tea'): 'This afternoon's going so slowly... Is it time for a brew yet?'

    b

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