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  1. leke's Avatar
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    #1

    A strict SVO language?

    1) I gave a book to my wife.
    2) A book, I gave to my wife.
    3) To my wife, I gave a book.

    I'm confused about some parts of English grammar. It's a SVO language, but are those rules strict? For example, the subject in example 1 is "I", but what about the other examples? Is it still "I"?

    Thanks :)

  2. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A strict SVO language?

    The subjects are underlined:

    1) I gave a book to my wife.


    2) A book, I gave to my wife.

    • The noun phrase "a book" is topicalized: moved to the front of the sentence for emphasis, or topic.

    3) To my wife, I gave a book.

    • The prepositional phrase "to my wife" is topicalized: moved to the front of the sentence for emphasis, or topic.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: A strict SVO language?

    Quote Originally Posted by leke View Post
    1) I gave a book to my wife.
    2) A book, I gave to my wife.
    3) To my wife, I gave a book.

    I'm confused about some parts of English grammar. It's a SVO language, but are those rules strict? For example, the subject in example 1 is "I", but what about the other examples? Is it still "I"?

    Thanks :)

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****



    (1) I think that occasionally the object may come first -- especially

    if you want to be humorous or sarcastic.

    (2) Let's say that I am a little overweight and you offer me some

    candy. I might smile and reply:

    Candy I don't need!!!

    (3) Let's say that you want to hurt someone's feelings. You

    could say, "I do not like you" or (even stronger and crueler):

    You I don't like!!!


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

  3. leke's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: A strict SVO language?

    I really must get the instant email notification fixed. Anyway, thanks for introducing to topicalisation.
    If anyone is interested... Topic-comment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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