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    #1

    beer, brew, brewsky,suds

    What is opinion on different words for beer?

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    #2

    Re: beer, brew, brewsky,suds

    My quick thoughts.
    Brew and brewsky are ok if understood as part of the whole context, but as a British person "brew" makes me think of tea first.

    "Suds" definitely makes me think of soap so I'm not sure it works.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: beer, brew, brewsky,suds

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    What is opinion on different words for beer?
    Du côté de chez... nous autres

    B Eng doesn't typically use 'brew' to refer to beer - though, while drinking, someone might say 'That's a good brew'. When you say 'Time for a brew', though, you mean a cup of tea. 'Brewsky' is unknown over here, as far as I know, as is 'suds'.

    People usually use measures (Imperial, of course) to refer to alcoholic drinks. 'A pint' means beer (by default - it would mean, say, cider, for someone who was known to drink cider). The term 'a swift half' is used to refer to any measure of any alcoholic drink - the precise meaning of 'half a pint of beer' is a conventional euphemism. Someone might say to a colleague 'Fancy a swift half on the way home after work?'

    To refer to lager (particularly Fosters or Castlemaine 4X) many people take a leaf out of Barry Humphries' book (he's an Australian comedian) and call it 'the amber fluid'. Recently it has morphed into 'the amber nectar', which seems to me a bit tautological. An Australian friend of mine used to refer to cans of lager as 'tinnies', which could be used to refer to their contents: 'Shall we stop off for a few tinnies mate?'

    Verbs that idiomatically collocate with drink in large amounts include 'sink' and 'put away'. Drinking swiftly is 'downing'.

    At the end of a night of drinking, your friends might 'pour you into a taxi'.

    b

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    #4

    Re: beer, brew, brewsky,suds

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Du côté de chez... nous autres

    B Eng doesn't typically use 'brew' to refer to beer - though, while drinking, someone might say 'That's a good brew'. When you say 'Time for a brew', though, you mean a cup of tea. 'Brewsky' is unknown over here, as far as I know, as is 'suds'.

    People usually use measures (Imperial, of course) to refer to alcoholic drinks. 'A pint' means beer (by default - it would mean, say, cider, for someone who was known to drink cider). The term 'a swift half' is used to refer to any measure of any alcoholic drink - the precise meaning of 'half a pint of beer' is a conventional euphemism. Someone might say to a colleague 'Fancy a swift half on the way home after work?'

    To refer to lager (particularly Fosters or Castlemaine 4X) many people take a leaf out of Barry Humphries' book (he's an Australian comedian) and call it 'the amber fluid'. Recently it has morphed into 'the amber nectar', which seems to me a bit tautological. An Australian friend of mine used to refer to cans of lager as 'tinnies', which could be used to refer to their contents: 'Shall we stop off for a few tinnies mate?'

    Verbs that idiomatically collocate with drink in large amounts include 'sink' and 'put away'. Drinking swiftly is 'downing'.

    At the end of a night of drinking, your friends might 'pour you into a taxi'.

    b
    Would "swift half'' and "pour into a taxi" be British or it's widespread?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: beer, brew, brewsky,suds

    Other teachers: ostap77's question looks as though it's for me, but it's not. Those expressions are common in Br. Eng, but I don't know if they're 'widespread' in the rest of the world.

    b

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: beer, brew, brewsky,suds

    When I saw the topic header, I immediately thought "beer." All of the words mentioned are common parlance for beer in AmE.

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