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  1. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #1

    Due to

    I learned, many years ago, that we use due to only when it is preceded by a linking verb and, in the absence of a linking verb, because of is the preferred phrase. Thus, we would not say that "he faled to act due to his laziness," but rather 'his failure to act was due to...." or "he failed to act because of...." Is this still considered correct? Are there any up-to-date opinions on this matter?

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    #2

    Re: Due to

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    I learned, many years ago, that we use due to only when it is preceded by a linking verb and, in the absence of a linking verb, because of is the preferred phrase. Thus, we would not say that "he faled to act due to his laziness," but rather 'his failure to act was due to...." or "he failed to act because of...." Is this still considered correct? Are there any up-to-date opinions on this matter?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    riquecohen,

    One of my favorite questions.

    (1) Yes, I also learned that "due" is an adjective, and

    "because of" is a preposition.

    The boss: Why are you late?

    The employee: I arrived late due to trafffic problems.

    I arrived late because of traffic problems.

    My lateness is due (to traffic problems).

    According to the rules, only the second and third sentences are

    considered "correct."

    But, of course, few people would express themselves using the

    third sentence.

    (2) I think that you are correct: "due to" is now accepted as a

    preposition along with "because of." I have no proof to offer, but

    I can report the following:

    At the best (in my opinion) adult ESL school in the United States,

    the final examination in advanced classes accepts "due to" as a

    preposition in sentences such as: I arrived late due to traffic

    problems.

    I think a few people are trying to keep "due to" an adjective, but they

    have lost the battle, along with the few people who insist on saying

    "It is I."


    ***** NOT a teacher *****


    P. S. And I suspect the people who insist on "This secret is between

    you and me" will lose to the growing numbers who say " ... between

    you and I."

    As you know, language is truly democratic. The majority rules.

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    #3

    Re: Due to

    NOT A TEACHER.

    I also think it's nowadays acceptable to say "due to" when one means "because of," at least as regards North America.

    I personally like using "due to" in this sense because it's a shorter way of saying "because of."

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    #4

    Re: Due to

    Parser, do you happen to know Bryan Garner's stance on this subject?

    Thanks.

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    #5

    Re: Due to

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    Parser, do you happen to know Bryan Garner's stance on this subject?

    Thanks.
    No, I don't. I shall check his book. Thanks for the tip.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Due to

    I'm in that category of well-educated people who rarely remembers that there is supposed to be (or once was) a difference between these phrases. I don't use "due to" often because it sounds contrived a lot of the time.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Due to

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I'm in that category of well-educated people who rarely remembers that there is supposed to be (or once was) a difference between these phrases. I don't use "due to" often because it sounds contrived a lot of the time.
    Me too. Or should that be I too?

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