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    #1

    Usage

    Respected Teachers,
    Please, highlight the difference between 'owing to' and 'due to'. I have often read that 'owing to' is always used at the beginning of the sentence while 'due to' and 'because of' are used in the middle of the sentence.Is this correct? Any other difference?

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    #2

    Re: Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by tipu s View Post
    Respected Teachers,
    Please, highlight the difference between 'owing to' and 'due to'. They have the same meaning and use.
    I have often read that 'owing to' is always used at the beginning of the sentence. Perhaps it is most commonly seen at the beginning of a sentence, but there is no reason it can't be used in the middle of a sentence.
    The committee decided that, owing to the lack of money, the trip will be cancelled.

    while 'due to' and 'because of' are used in the middle of the sentence.Is this correct? They can be also used at the beginning of a sentence.
    (Due to)(Because of) the lack of money, the committee decided to cancel the trip.

    All three phrases are probably most commonly seen at the beginning of sentences.
    2006

  1. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by tipu s View Post
    Respected Teachers,
    Please, highlight the difference between 'owing to' and 'due to'. I have often read that 'owing to' is always used at the beginning of the sentence while 'due to' and 'because of' are used in the middle of the sentence. Is this correct? Any other difference?
    Well, traditional grammar dictates that usage (See here), but for modern day speakers, and writers, the distinction seems to be a thing of the past. Which isn't to say the modern way is better. Know both.

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