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    #1

    slug in the back

    Hi

    Does "I'm not looking to take a slug in the back of my head over this" mean that I hope I won't get a bullet in the back of my head because of this?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: slug in the back

    Yes - someone will kill him.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: slug in the back

    Yes. Bullets that have been fired are often referred to as "slugs."

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    #4

    Re: slug in the back

    Hi

    But is saying that "I hope I won't ..." is OK? Or maybe I changed it too much?

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: slug in the back

    It's hard to say exactly without the context. He may be saying that he has done enough and isn't willing to do any more because if he does it will be too dangerous for him and the people being hurt/offended will take their revenge on him.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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