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  1. STUCK
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    #1

    idiodialect

    what is idiodialect? I have to write a paper on this but when I asked what it was the teacher said it was self explanitory. can anyone help

    STUCK

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: idiodialect

    Idio- comes from the Greek word idios meaning own, or individual. Dialect means, a regional form of speech; a variety of language with non-standard vocabulary, pronunciation, or grammar.

    All the best,

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    #3

    Re: idiodialect

    An idiolect is the language pattern of an individual at one point in his life. A dialect is the language pattern of a particular group, usually regional or cultural.
    An idiodialect, judging by what I can determine from my readings on the internet, refers to variations of a dialect exhibited by different subgroups of speakers within that dialect. In other words, people living in the Southeastern US may speak a particular dialect belonging to that region, but women in that region will speak an idiodialect, or a form of that dialect that is particular to women from that region.
    If this is what your teacher calls "self-explanatory" then you need a new teacher or he needs a different job.
    By this definition, every dialect is an idiodialect in that it is spoken by members of a particular group.

  3. #4

    Re: idiodialect

    Thank Heavens we've got you, Mike "Whiner", to keep it nice and simple for all of us here.

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    #5

    Re: idiodialect

    Yikes! Did I hit a nerve, Marylin? I think I might have. Unpucker a little, O.K.? This isn't all that serious of a business.

  4. #6

    Re: idiodialect

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner
    Yikes! Did I hit a nerve, Marylin? I think I might have. Unpucker a little, O.K.? This isn't all that serious of a business.

    Did I hit a nerve, Marylin?

    Yes, you did. I didn't like your remark. People are stuck with a variety of teachers and it's not up to you to judge them.


    This isn't all that serious of a business

    If that's so, don't bring it up next time, will you?

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    #7

    Re: idiodialect

    I agree with the basic point that it's not really self-explanatory, as the prefix used doesn't match the definition with 'idiodialect', though it does with 'idiolect'. Wouldn't sub-dialect or something be a better term. And can we calm things down a little here?

  5. #8

    Re: idiodialect

    I agree with the basic point that it's not really self-explanatory

    Right, and that's all that needs to be said.

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    #9

    Re: idiodialect

    O.K., I'll curb the editorializing. It's probably not a good idea to let students see dissention among teachers who should have their students' educational needs as a common goal. The remarks I made are more appropriate for a pedagogy forum, and offered the student [STUCK] no additional help.

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