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    #1

    swift pint or pour into a taxi

    If someone has been drinking a lot you pour him into a taxi. Or having a swift pint . Are these used in the States?

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    #2

    Re: swift pint or pour into a taxi

    The taxi phrase is understandable. Americans might go out for a beer or a drink, but not usually for a pint.

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    #3

    Re: swift pint or pour into a taxi

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    The taxi phrase is understandable. Americans might go out for a beer or a drink, but not usually for a pint.
    What would you say for "pour him into a taxi"?

  1. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: swift pint or pour into a taxi

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    What would you say for "pour him into a taxi"?
    I haven't used it myself, but I have heard others use it, yes.

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    #5

    Re: swift pint or pour into a taxi

    Put him in a taxi. 'poured him into a taxi' is a figurative use, as 'he' is not a liquid or a collection of small particles which can flow. Given the association with drinking and pints, it is an easily understandable metaphor, I think.

    If Americans don't drink pints, what do they drink? Gallons?

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    #6

    Re: swift pint or pour into a taxi

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post

    If Americans don't drink pints, what do they drink? Gallons?
    Kegs, mugs, bottles, cans of beer.

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    #7

    Re: swift pint or pour into a taxi

    Or "glasses." In fact, they are often pint-sized, but we don't call them "pints."

    Let me buy you a beer. Let's go get some beers after work.

    We wouldn't say "a pint" or "a couple pints" there.

    The very idea beyond "pour" is that he's so drunk he's all liquid/liquor now.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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