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    #1

    Usage and Meaning of "So"

    Dear All,

    Is the following sentence is grammatically right???

    - Tangible progress has been achieved such as the "so" reached in the last project.

    My concern here is whether the usage of the word "so" in the sentence is right and to know the actual structural role it plays here (e.g., noun, adverb, adjective ...etc?). In addition could you please explain the exact meaning of "so" in the sentence.

    Thank you all in advance.

  1. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Usage and Meaning of "So"

    Hello sayd19

    "so" functions as a noun in that context, but I can't for the life of me understand what it is supposed to mean here:


    • Tangible progress has been achieved, such as the "so" reached in the last project.


    Could it be an acronym?


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    #3

    Re: Usage and Meaning of "So"

    Thanks lauralie2 for your attempt to help.

    What about if the sentence becomes as follows:

    - Tangible progress has been achieved, such as the "so" reached progress in the last project.

    and what about if we say that the word "progress" in red has been dropped to avoid repetation??? in this case, so would be considered as an adverb and "reached" as an adjective.

    Just crazy thoughts

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    #4

    Re: Usage and Meaning of "So"

    Quote Originally Posted by sayd19 View Post
    Just crazy thoughts
    Yes


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    #5

    Re: Usage and Meaning of "So"

    Thanks, fivejedjon for your contribution. However I am looking forward to a more positive one replying to the original post.

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    #6

    Re: Usage and Meaning of "So"

    Quote Originally Posted by sayd19 View Post
    Thanks, fivejedjon for your contribution. However I am looking forward to a more positive one replying to the original post.
    lauralie2 gave as good an answer as possible on the words you posted.

    Your further posting:

    What about if the sentence becomes as follows:

    - Tangible progress has been achieved, such as the "so" reached progress

    and what about if we say that the word "progress" in red has been dropped to avoid repetation??? in this case, so would be considered as an adverb and "reached" as an adjective.

    Just crazy thoughts


    made little sense. Trying again, I can just about see what you mean, but I can only imagine that, if you are right, then the sentence was produced by a non-native speaker with a very sketchy command of English indeed.


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    #7

    Re: Usage and Meaning of "So"

    Well, I guess the last explanation I gave could be acceptable. Here below I elaborate it on:

    - Tangible progress has been achieved, such as the "so" reached (progress) in the last project.

    This is supposed to be the complete sentence. It consists of independent clause: (Tangible progress has been achieved) and dependent: (such as the "so" reached (progress) in the last project). However, the repeated word (progress) in the dependent clause has been omitted to avoid repetition as it is understood from the context that the writer refers to the subject of the independent clause which is "progress".

    It would have been much better if the writer used the same verb "achieved" in both clauses in order to emphasize more he/she refers to the subject of the independent clause. Accordingly, the whole sentence could be:

    - Tangible progress has been achieved, such as the "so" achieved in the last project.

    I guess the last sentence is clear and correct.

    In this case "so" is an adverb, "achieved" is an adjective and the combination "so achieved" describes the omitted repeated word "progress".

    Well, I am looking forward to your comments dear members.

  4. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Usage and Meaning of "So"

    Quote Originally Posted by sayd19 View Post
    Thanks lauralie2 for your attempt to help.

    What about if the sentence becomes as follows:

    - Tangible progress has been achieved, such as the "so" reached progress in the last project.

    and what about if we say that the word "progress" in red has been dropped to avoid repetation??? in this case, so would be considered as an adverb and "reached" as an adjective.
    Don't drop it. Drop it only if the resulting sentence is easy for the reader to understand.

    Your example "the so reached progress" parses as follows:

    "the so" = noun <subject>
    "reached" = verb <main verb>
    "progress" = noun <object>

    Note, "the so" is not a known noun phrase in English. Which makes your example sentence ungrammatical, unless that is "the so" is defined. What does "the so" mean?

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    #9

    Re: Usage and Meaning of "So"

    Quote Originally Posted by sayd19 View Post

    - Tangible progress has been achieved, such as the "so" achieved in the last project.

    In this case "so" is an adverb, "achieved" is an adjective and the combination "so achieved" describes the omitted repeated word "progress".
    Nope. Sorry. The second "achieved" is a verb: it's what "the so" did: it achieved (progress).

    Notice the word "so" is introduced by the word "the", "the so". Only nouns are introduced by "the". Which means "so" cannot be an adverb in "the so".


    Note, since the first clause is in passive voice, maybe you would like to say this instead:


    • Tangible progress has been achieved, such as it was achieved by the "so" in the last project.


    Again, "the so" isn't English, yet. Define it and it'll be English.

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