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    #1

    ellipsis

    Can one say:
    1-Do you want to talk about his good side or his bad?
    instead of:
    2-Do you want to talk about his good side or his bad one?

    Can one say:
    3-Do you want to talk about his good points or his bad?
    instead of:
    4-Do you want to talk about his good points or his bad ones?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: ellipsis

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    Can one say:
    1-Do you want to talk about his good side or his bad?
    instead of:
    2-Do you want to talk about his good side or his bad one?

    Can one say:
    3-Do you want to talk about his good points or his bad?
    instead of:
    4-Do you want to talk about his good points or his bad ones?
    In a short sentence like this, I'd say: 5. "Do you want to talk about his good or his bad side?"
    This sounds contrary to good principles because it defers the noun to the end, and could be confusing in a longer sentence. It requires the proper stress on 'good' and 'bad'.
    6. "Do you want to talk about his good side or his bad side?" is the simplest and often the clearest solution.
    I don't much like 1 - 4, but still, they're not wrong either.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: ellipsis

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    In a short sentence like this, I'd say: 5. "Do you want to talk about his good or his bad side?"
    This sounds contrary to good principles because it defers the noun to the end, and could be confusing in a longer sentence. It requires the proper stress on 'good' and 'bad'.
    6. "Do you want to talk about his good side or his bad side?" is the simplest and often the clearest solution.
    I don't much like 1 - 4, but still, they're not wrong either.
    I can see Raymott's point. Personally I am not as unhappy as he with 1, 3 and 4, I don't like 2, but it's not wrong.

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