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    #1

    since before

    "I have lived here since before the war."
    Is this sentence grammatically correct ?
    Shouldn't the correct form be - (since + a point of time), where the point of time is a noun ?

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    #2

    Re: since before

    Quote Originally Posted by Debpriya View Post
    "I have lived here since before the war."
    Is this sentence grammatically correct ? YES
    Shouldn't the correct form be - (since + a point of time), where the point of time is a noun ? NO
    You are right in your since + point in time, but the the point(or period) in time does not have to be a noun, as shown in the following:

    I have lived here since...

    ... the war
    ... before the war
    ... the war ended
    ... I left school
    ... 1945.

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    #3

    Re: since before

    Quote Originally Posted by Debpriya View Post
    "I have lived here since before the war."
    Is this sentence grammatically correct ?
    Shouldn't the correct form be - (since + a point of time), where the point of time is a noun ?
    ***** NOT a teacher *****


    Debpriya,

    I may be wrong (repeat: wrong), but I think that some books

    explain two prepositions together like that by saying that

    a sentence such as yours is a short way to say:

    I have lived here since a time before the war.

    We can then say that "a time" is the noun object of the

    preposition "since" and that "the war" is the noun object of the

    preposition "before." The prepositional phrase "before the war"

    modifies (belongs to/ is placed under/ further explains) the

    noun "time." The prepositional phrase "since a time" in turn

    modifies the verb "have lived."

    *****


    Here is an example from one of my books of two prepositions together:

    Come out from behind those whiskers.

    The author says that it is probably an ellipsis (missing words) of:

    Come out from your hiding place behind those whiskers.


    ***** NOT a teacher *****

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    #4

    Re: since before

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    I think that some books

    explain two prepositions together like that by saying that

    a sentence such as yours is a short way to say:

    I have lived here since a time before the war.

    I have encountered suggestions like this, but I prefer to analyse the language as it is, not as we think someone intended it to be. There is no need to imagine a 'missing' noun such as time, unless we believe in a rule that prepositions must be followed by a noun.

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