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    • Join Date: Nov 2010
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    #1

    please help me!

    I am an English teacher at a high school in Vietnam. Last week, my school held a teaching competition. I was low-appreciated when I explained my students a grammar point. My students' question was that whether they could say "would have not let" in stead of "would not have let" or not, and my response was "possible but rare". Was I right or wrong when I said that?
    Because your answer is very important, so can you reply me as soon as possible? I have been very depressed when my fellow teachers say that they have never heard or read or seen anywhere "would have not". Please help me!!!!!!!!!!

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: please help me!

    Quote Originally Posted by hothithu1985 View Post
    I am an English teacher at a high school in Vietnam. Last week, my school held a teaching competition. I was low-appreciated when I explained my students a grammar point. My students' question was that whether they could say "would have not let" in stead of "would not have let" or not, and my response was "possible but rare". Was I right or wrong when I said that?
    Because your answer is very important, so can you reply me as soon as possible? I have been very depressed when my fellow teachers say that they have never heard or read or seen anywhere "would have not". Please help me!!!!!!!!!!
    I think it's conceivable that someone might say, "would have not let", but it does sound rather strange.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: please help me!

    I agree that it's possible, but rare, just as 5jj said (in other words) and just have you said.

    Imagine three parents discussing a situation.

    1: I would have let him go if he'd asked.
    2. I would have let my son go too.
    3. Really? I would have NOT let my daughter go.

    I can easily see that. Standard, no. Possible in a conversation that you'd hear it? Yes.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: please help me!

    Quote Originally Posted by hothithu1985 View Post
    I am an English teacher at a high school in Vietnam. Last week, my school held a teaching competition. I was low-appreciated when I explained my students a grammar point. My students' question was that whether they could say "would have not let" in stead of "would not have let" or not, and my response was "possible but rare". Was I right or wrong when I said that?
    Because your answer is very important, so can you reply me as soon as possible? I have been very depressed when my fellow teachers say that they have never heard or read or seen anywhere "would have not". Please help me!!!!!!!!!!

    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********


    Teacher Hothithu,


    Do not feel bad. Your students are very lucky to have an

    excellent teacher such as you are.

    As members Fivejedjon and Ms. D said, that position of

    "not" is, indeed, "rare" but perfectly "good" English.

    I was not able to find anything about this matter in

    my books or on the Web, but I was able to communicate

    with an outstanding English-language professional who

    really knows her grammar. She agrees 100% with Ms. D.

    That teacher told me that this "rare" position is only

    used as a contradiction or rebuttal of what someone else

    has just said. Study Ms. D's example very carefully. You can

    then give this "contradiction/rebuttal" rule to your students.

    By the way, that teacher also told me that if you wish to express the

    rebuttal by using the usual position of "not," you can just pronounce

    "not" strongly:

    I would have NOT let my daughter go!

    or simply

    I would NOT have let my daughter go!

    I am sure that your students -- and colleagues -- will soon

    realize what a great teacher you are.


    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********
    Last edited by Barb_D; 03-Nov-2010 at 14:13.

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