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    #1

    1600's

    Why there is an apostrophe followed "1600" in the following sentence:
    "Not until the late 1600's did using a fork become a common custom."
    Is it actually 1600's century?

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    #2

    Re: 1600's

    When discussing centuries, or decades, some styles of writing English use an apostrophe. "The 70's were a decade of decadence."

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...g-decades.html

    It is a matter of style, not of a hard language rule.

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    #3

    Re: 1600's

    In BE the apostophe is not normally used.

    'The 70s was a decade of decadence.'

    'Not until the late 1600s did using a fork become a common custom.'

    After all, the 70s means the seventies, not the seventy's.

    Rover

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 1600's

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    In BE the apostophe is not normally used.

    'The 70s was a decade of decadence.'

    'Not until the late 1600s did using a fork become a common custom.'

    After all, the 70s means the seventies, not the seventy's.

    Rover
    I agree. What purpose does the apostrophe serve?

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 1600's

    Quote Originally Posted by ziawj2 View Post
    Why there is an apostrophe followed "1600" in the following sentence:
    "Not until the late 1600's did using a fork become a common custom."
    Is it actually 1600's century?
    The 1600s refers to the 17th century.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: 1600's

    I never use the apostrophe in decades or centuries either, but it really is a matter of style, as Dave said originally.

    As with most style issues, consistency is more important than what you actually do. Don't refer to the 1920's in one paragraph and the 1960s in the next.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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