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    #1

    at /in

    Hi there,

    Which one should be the best answer, in or at?
    what is the difference between 'in the interview' and 'at the interview'?


    Success depends on how well he does (at/ in) the interview.

    Tks
    simon

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    #2

    Re: at /in

    Hi there,
    Another similar question:


    He was in a critical condition at the hospital.

    (Does 'in the hospital' makes sense here?
    What is the difference between 'at the hospital' and 'in the hospital'?

    Tks
    simon

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    #3

    Re: at /in

    Hi there
    One more question

    Can I use 'in a shop' here? What is the difference between 'at a shop ' and 'in a shop ' here?

    A Beijing police officer shows off a counterfeit police jacket as the force launches a crackdown against illegal selling of police equipment at a shop in the capital.

  1. Eden Darien's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: at /in

    NOT A NATIVE TEACHER

    People get very confused about these two prepositions, but there are a couple of simple tips you can use to help yourself remember how to use them.
    In, as a preposition of place, is usually used to talk about the position of someone or something inside large places such as countries, continents, big cities etc.
    For example:-
    She grew up in New Zealand.
    At, as a preposition of place, is usually used to talk about the position of someone or something inside small and unimportant places such as villages, small towns etc.
    For example:-
    I'lll meet you at the pub.

    At is also commonly used with proper names such as buildings or organizations.
    For example:-
    I first met her at Harrods.
    She works at the bank.
    In, as a preposition of time, is usually used when talking about parts of the day.
    For example:-
    I'll see you in the morning, in the evening, in the afternoon.
    At, as a preposition of time, is usually used with clock time.
    For example:-
    My train leaves at 6.30 am.
    !Note - As with most so called "rules" in English there are exceptions, so just to confuse you we always say "at" night.

  2. Munch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: at /in

    Success depends on how well he does (at/ in) the interview.
    "In" is better to my ears, but "at" is OK too.

    He was in a critical condition at the hospital.
    If a person is sick or injured in hospital, I would always say "in hospital" but the people visiting him might just be "at" the hospital.

  3. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: at /in

    Quote Originally Posted by Munch View Post
    "In" is better to my ears, but "at" is OK too.



    If a person is sick or injured in hospital, I would always say "in hospital" but the people visiting him might just be "at" the hospital.
    I agree. In AmE, we would say "in the hospital."

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