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    #1

    tense

    Hi there,

    Any subtle differences in meanings of the following sentences?

    1. She will go to London tomorrow.
    2. She is going to London tomorrow.

    3. She is going to go to London tomorrow.

    4. She will be going to London tomorrow.



    Tks
    simon

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    #2

    Re: tense

    They all express the same idea to me. No subtle differences.

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    #3

    Re: tense

    Hi there,
    Any difference in tone or intention?

    tks
    simon

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    #4

    Re: tense

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    They all express the same idea to me. No subtle differences.
    I agree.

    ________________________________________________

    Hi there,
    Any difference in tone or intention? no

    simon


    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    2006

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    #5

    Re: tense

    Quote Originally Posted by simon1234 View Post
    Hi there,

    Any subtle differences in meanings of the following sentences?

    1. She will go to London tomorrow.
    2. She is going to London tomorrow.

    3. She is going to go to London tomorrow.

    4. She will be going to London tomorrow.
    I think that there are differences but, as we have seen, other speakers feel that there are not!

    The reason for this difference of opinion is that in many situations, different speakers may use any one of your four suggestions to describe the same situation. There is normally no 'correct' choice of tense/aspect. It depends on how the speaker sees at the situation at the moment of speaking.

    I see the difference as follows:

    1. Her going is a certainty.
    2. There is some form of arrangement for her to go.
    3. There is evidence in the present of her future going.
    4. A 'casual' way of expressing the future without involving certainty, intention, arrangement, evidence, etc.

    In practical terms there may be very little difference in some situations, such as the one we are looking at.

    You can find out more about different ways of expressing the future at: http://www.gramorak.com/Articles/Future.pdf

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    #6

    Re: tense

    Quote Originally Posted by simon1234 View Post
    Hi there,

    Any subtle differences in meanings of the following sentences?

    1. She will go to London tomorrow.
    2. She is going to London tomorrow.

    3. She is going to go to London tomorrow.

    4. She will be going to London tomorrow.



    Tks
    simon


    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********


    Simon, this is how I understand it -- rightly or wrongly.

    Teacher: Do you have any plans for the weekend?

    Student: Oh, yes. I am going to the beach.

    To some native speakers, if the student had answered "I will go to the

    beach," that would have sounded a bit "strange." As the

    other posters have already told you, "be going to" is often used

    when you have already made up your mind before someone

    asks you a question.

    (P. S. One reason that "I will go" may sound a bit "strange" is the

    use of "will" for the first person. If you used the "correct"

    auxiliary, then it might not sound so "strange": I shall go to the

    beach. Originally, "will" was used to express determination -- not the

    simple future. Maybe some native speakers in the United States still

    sense this difference a bit -- even though 95% (?) of Americans use

    "will" instead of "shall.")

    *****


    Teacher: Do you have any plans for the weekend?

    Student: Not really.

    Teacher: Why don't you go to the beach?

    Student: I don't know.

    Teacher: It will be a great experience. You should go.

    Student: OK. You have convinced me. I will go to the beach

    this weekend.

    "will" + bare infinitive is used when you make a decision at that

    moment.



    (P.S. I think that "OK, I am going to the beach" would be "correct"

    if you wanted to emphasize your decision. It may also signal a hint of

    displeasure: OK! OK! I am going to clean my room. Stop nagging me!!!)


    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********
    Last edited by TheParser; 04-Nov-2010 at 12:33.

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    #7

    Re: tense

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post


    (P. S. One reason that "I will go" may sound a bit "strange" is the

    use of "will" for the first person. If you used the "correct"

    auxiliary, then it might not sound so "strange": I shall go to the

    beach. Originally, "will" was used to express determination -- not the

    simple future. Maybe some native speakers in the United States still

    sense this difference a bit -- even though 95% (?) of Americans use

    "will" instead of "shall.")
    I was relieved to see that you put correct in inverted commas. Few writers today would insist that shall is the correct form for the first person future auxiliary.

    The reason that it sound strange is to be found in the other explanations that you and I have suggested.

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    #8

    Re: tense

    Teacher: Do you have any plans for the weekend?

    Student: Not really.

    Hi there,
    Thank you so much for your responses.
    One more question:


    Teacher: Why don't you go to the beach?

    Student: I don't know.

    Teacher: It will be a great experience. You should go.

    Student: OK. You have convinced me. I will go to the beach

    this weekend.

    "will" + bare infinitive is used when you make a decision at that

    moment.


    Does the 'will' in 'It will be a great experience...' mean a decision made at that moment? If not, what does 'will' mean here?

    Thank
    simon

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    #9

    Re: tense

    Hi there,
    Thanks so much.
    Here is another question:


    1. She will go to London tomorrow.
    2. She is going to London tomorrow.

    3. She is going to go to London tomorrow.


    I see the difference as follows:

    1. Her going is a certainty.
    2. There is some form of arrangement for her to go.
    3. There is evidence in the present of her future going.

    (I still don't see the differnce between 1 and 3 since both of them mean she has made up her mind to go to London tomorrow)
    For number 2, I still don't understand 'some form of arrangement of her'
    What does it mean?

    thanks
    simon

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    #10

    Re: tense

    Quote Originally Posted by simon1234 View Post
    Teacher: Do you have any plans for the weekend?

    Student: Not really.

    Hi there,
    Thank you so much for your responses.
    One more question:


    Teacher: Why don't you go to the beach?

    Student: I don't know.

    Teacher: It will be a great experience. You should go.

    Student: OK. You have convinced me. I will go to the beach

    this weekend.

    "will" + bare infinitive is used when you make a decision at that

    moment.


    Does the 'will' in 'It will be a great experience...' mean a decision made at that moment? If not, what does 'will' mean here?

    Thank
    simon
    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********


    Simon,

    Thank you for the note.

    In "It will be a great experience," I think that this use of

    "will" in American English simply indicates a prediction.

    For example:

    2011 will/is going to be an interesting year in world history!!!


    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********

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