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  1. Kaylee's Avatar
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    #1

    Conjugating

    Hello everyone and thank you for taking the time to help me out, if you want to that it is. But my thanks is still given because I appreciate any time you take to read the thread. :)

    Anyways, here I go...

    I've read through four different Language Arts (as my school calls the grammar books) about conjugating Verbs and tenses. Each book either didn't really "speak" about it, or wasn't making sense.

    I have Dyslexia and when my teacher tried to explain the full meaning of conjugating verbs and tenses and I wrote notes, I made it into complete gibberish...so I asked her what I should do and she suggested looking online for help. I tried Wiki, but it was really confusing.

    Could anyone help me understand Conjugating Verbs and tenses?

    Thank you for reading!

    Kaylee~

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Conjugating

    Conjugating is not something we normally associate with English verbs. It means giving the different forms of a verb as they vary according to number, person, tense, etc.

    It is useful with, for example, Latin, in which the present tense can be ‘conjugated’: amo, amas, amat, amamus, amatis, amant.

    The equivalent in English would be: I love, you (singular) love, he/she/it loves, we love, you (plural), love, they love.

    There are six different verb endings in Latin, and they need to be learnt somehow. Chanting out the six forms in succession is one way of learning them, and this way is what was commonly meant by ‘conjugating’.

    It is far simpler in English to know that the third person singular form of all verbs (with a very small number of exceptions) adds –(e)s.

    It may be (and I am guessing here) that your books take ‘conjugating’ to mean learning (perhaps by reciting) the principal parts of irregular verbs. These are: 1. the bare infinitive (also known as the base or first form; 2. the past tense form (also known as the –ed or second form); 3. the past participle (also known as the –en or third form). From these all other verb forms and tenses can be constructed. Examples are:

    Go* – went – gone**
    Come – came – come
    Teach – taught – taught.
    Cut – cut – cut.

    *From the form go, we can construct goes and going.
    **From this we can construct perfect tenses and passive forms.

  3. Kaylee's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Conjugating

    Thank you so much, Fivejedjon!

    My teachers and books didn't really teach it really good, and when I checked the dictionary and online, it made me confused more than I was before. :/

    Conjugating is not something we normally associate with English verbs. It means giving the different forms of a verb as they vary according to number, person, tense, etc.
    That helps loads!

    Thank you for taking the time to answer my question, Fivejedjon!
    :huggles

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