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  1. Newbie
    Interested in Language

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    #1

    soups

    Hello Teachers,
    What is the difference between broth, consommé and bouillon? Thanks,

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    #2

    Re: soups

    There's no difference.

    Rover

    EDIT: When I stick my neck out and write something like that, somebody always comes along and says 'Oh, yes there is!'

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: soups

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    There's no difference.

    Rover

    EDIT: When I stick my neck out and write something like that, somebody always comes along and says 'Oh, yes there is!'
    Oh Yes there is

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: soups

    broth - thick soup
    consomme - clear soup
    soup- well, soup

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: soups

    Broth isn't thick soup where I come from. It's the almost watery liquid stuff the good stuff floats (or sinks) in.

    Chowders (if you care) are thick, milk- or cream-based soups. Clam chowder, corn chowder, etc.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: soups

    Quote Originally Posted by karago27 View Post
    Hello Teachers,
    What is the difference between broth, consommé and bouillon? Thanks,
    Broth (also called stock) is the clear liquid that derives from cooking fish, meat, fowl or vegetables. Irma Rombauer, in "The Joy of Cooking," says that a bouillon is a concentrated stock which has been reduced to give it more flavor, while a consommé is a clarified, double-strength stock which has been further reduced. Craig Claiborne, in "The New York Times Cook Book" agrees and and tells us that a consommé, in turn, becomes a double consommé when it is reduced still further.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: soups

    Thanks for that, riquecohen.

    It's still true for my generation of BrE speakers, however, that a broth can be pretty thick.

    Here, for example, BBC - Food - Recipes : Scotch broth is a recipe for Scotch broth, a splendidly glutinous repast on a cold day.

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: soups

    I'm glad I just finished lunch or I"d be jonesing for some soup right now. As it was, I had some jambalaya.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  8. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: soups

    "jonesing" ?

    That's a new one on me.

    Could you explain, please?

  9. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: soups

    I should let Munch explain. The specialist in the unsavory!

    Drug addicts "jones" for a fix. It's been co-opted to mean "I'm having a craving."

    Usually I'm jonesing for chocolate.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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