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    #1

    who for whoever?

    Dear teachers,
    Yesterday a teacher from another department of my college asked me on the school bus two questions about the following sentences taken from a textbook on tourism:

    Most other suppliers of travel products, e.g. hotels, cruise lines, rental car companies, tour operators, don't have any requirements at all for who they will recognize as a travel agency. For example, CLIA, the Cruise Line International Association, will basically allow anyone with a business licence and who pays a joining fee then sell cruises for their member cruise lines.

    His first question was about "don't have any requirements at all for who they will recognize as a travel agency". He did not know what "for who they will recognize as a travel agency" actually means. To tell you the truth, I also found it very difficult to understand. I inferred that "don't have any requirements at all for who they will recognize as a travel agency" is equal in meaning to "don't have any requirements at all for whoever they will recognize as a travel agency." But as we Chinese do not speak this way, I was and am not sure of my inference. Does this sentence mean that "Most other suppliers of travel products, don't have any requirements at all for anyone" or " Most other suppliers of travel products don't have any requirements at all for a travel agency. " ?

    His second question was about the latter sentence in the above quote: For example, CLIA, the Cruise Line International Association, will basically allow anyone with a business licence and who pays a joining fee then sell cruises for their member cruise lines.

    He asked about the relationship between the different parts of the sentence. But I think the confusion about the relationship between the different parts in this sentence is caused the misprint of "then". In my opinion, it should have been "to" instead, for we say "allow somebody/ something to do something", rather than "allow somebody/something do something".

    Please help me and my fellow teacher out of this trouble.
    Thanks.
    Richard

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    #2

    Re: who for whoever?

    You could say then to sell, but I agree that it requires to.

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    #3

    Re: who for whoever?

    No, 'who' here does not stand for 'whoever'. The meaning is '...have no requirements concerning the question: "WHO(M) will they recognize as...?" ')

    Functionally, 'who...agency' is an embedded nominal clause, standing as object of the preposition 'for'.

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    #4

    Re: who for whoever?

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    No, 'who' here does not stand for 'whoever'. The meaning is '...have no requirements concerning the question: "WHO(M) will they recognize as...?" ')

    Functionally, 'who...agency' is an embedded nominal clause, standing as object of the preposition 'for'.
    Please do not laugh at me for my poor English. So, the structure of a preposition followed a who-clause is acceptalbe? If I were the writer of the article, I would phrase it this way: Many other suppliers of travel products do not have any requirements at all for companies they recognize as a travel agency. This phrasing is easier for a Chinese learner of English to understand, as in Chinese we think this way.
    Certainly, I have to remember that when I am learning English, I have to learn to think your way.
    Many thanks.

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    #5

    Re: who for whoever?

    Yes, nominal clauses frequently stand as the objects of both verbs and prepositions.

    Although your rephrased version is grammatically possible, it does not necessarily mean the same thing as the original: your sentence seems to refer to requirements (concerning something unspecified) for companies already recognized as travel agencies, while the original refers specifically to requirements concerning criteria needing to be met in order for companies to be recognized as travel agents.

    Of the two sentences, only the original unambiguously carries this meaning.

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