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  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    I loved Underdog. Almost as much as Rocky and Bullwinkle.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    (And if you want to talk about "weird" English expressions, ask an AmE ESL teacher about the odd Britishisms we have to explain to students, and Bob's your uncle they'll waffle on for a fortnight. )
    My favo(u)rite expressions are the ones that Nessa (on the UK sitcom Gavin & Stacey) comes up with. I love the way she turns a phrase. The writing is fabUlous.

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #13

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    (And if you want to talk about "weird" English expressions, ask an AmE ESL teacher about the odd Britishisms we have to explain to students, and Bob's your uncle they'll waffle on for a fortnight. )
    Nice to hear AmE ESL teachers are also teaching proper English.

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    #14

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    Sorry I did not notice the kind posts to this thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes, it sounds weird to me too. But how do you feel about 'counselling' in the same situation?
    I guess, I would say student counselling, not using the perfectly good noun "counsel." I'd use counselling not counsel because I suppose the latter has come to mean "counsellor" or an abstract noun referring to counsellors. Wikipedia says a "A counsel or a counsellor gives advice." Do counsellors give counsel in the US?

    Quote Originally Posted by lauralie2
    I'm interested in seeing the context. Would you post it?
    Sure
    "If you were writing with a question about undergraduate advising in xyz subject (including transfer courses, xyz advisors, course selection, meetings, etc.), please re-send your email to the interim Faculty Director of Advising, Dr. X at email address. "

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D
    T, what do you call what we call academic advisors? What do you call the service they are performing?
    For me, academic advisors advise, or give advice. Hence in the above, I guess I'd write, "If you are writing with a question about undergraduate advice/undergraduate advisors/advice for undergraduates..."

    I was under the impression that "momentarily" meant in UKE "only for a moment", but perhaps the "in a moment" AmE has been accepted in the UK too. I did not understand it when I was in Chicago, and ran to catch the train that I thought, incorrectly, would be leaving after stopping "only for a moment". I have never heard of "momently" but it might be a good way of differentiating. But then I would say "briefly" to mean *momently.*

    But then perhaps some people say, Yes.
    Southern humor - Frank Baugh
    "Your loan counselor will be with you briefly." Do folks say that in the UK. If my loan counselor said he was going to be with me briefly I might think that my load had been rejected.

    I am still trying to work out if "I work a Job" is American English or just wrong (on another thread).
    Last edited by timtak; 10-Nov-2010 at 04:09. Reason: Spelling corrections.

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    #15

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    Although a speaker of British English myself, I tend to find it wise to think twice before criticizing American English, for two main reasons:

    1. AmE often acts as a conserver of older/original meanings of words now consigned in BrE to history. One example that springs to mind is the use of 'guess' to mean 'think/suppose', which, far from a 'modern' invention or distortion, actually preserves a sense dating back to Middle English (I gesse, "I think", is common in Chaucer), whereas modern BrE "I reckon" originally meant "I count"!

    Another is the - in my view, commendable - preservation of the present subjunctive after constructions expressing preference or necessity, e.g. It is vital that she be on time for her appointment - once de rigeur in all varieties of educated English. Frankly, I wince on hearing such locutions as ?It is vital that she is on time for her appointment (predicating the act in question as a fact rather than as a merely hypothetical notion) and find the use of 'should' here - normally a form expressing obligation rather than hypothesis - only marginally less objectionable!

    2. It tends to be more logical and systematic in its application of syntactic rules, which must, at the very least, be admitted to be of benefit to the non-native learner.

    One example among a number that could be cited is the regular concord of subject and verbal number in AmE. The oft-quoted assertion that ?The government are... somehow denotes a significantly different level of 'unity' from syntactically sound and logical the government is is one that I have never found particularly persuasive.

    P.S. One small objection that I do have to AmE is the common use of ?different than, as opposed to etymologically justifiable different from.

  6. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #16

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    Quote Originally Posted by timtak View Post
    "If you were writing with a question about undergraduate advising in xyz subject (including transfer courses, xyz advisors, course selection, meetings, etc.), please re-send your email to the interim Faculty Director of Advising, Dr. X at email address."
    Yup. It sounds odd to me too.





    ______________________
    Re: "I work a Job"

    I've heard it, but haven't yet used it.

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    #17

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    P.S. One small objection that I do have to AmE is the common use of ?different than, as opposed to etymologically justifiable different from.
    The British use "different to" instead.

  8. Raymott's Avatar
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    #18

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    Quote Originally Posted by English Teacher, taja609 View Post
    It really sound weird to me too..however, my opinion is not to correct someone speaking American English, to be honest I didin't know about advisory in this context either, but there are certain sthereotypes that in my opinion should be left the way they are, of course, if we are sure the ones using them are likely not to be mistaken, like in your case.

  9. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #19

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    The British use "different to" instead.
    Now that's a revelation. Is that any better than "different than?" I find that my students usually say "different than," no matter how frequently I correct them. (I'm the first American teacher they've had.)

  10. 5jj's Avatar
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    #20

    Re: Weird US English Part 436

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    Now that's a revelation. Is that any better than "different than?" I find that my students usually say "different than," no matter how frequently I correct them. (I'm the first American teacher they've had.)
    I'm a from person. The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (6th edn) gives all three, labelling to BrE and than AmE in its examples. In a usage box it says, 'Different from is the most common structure in both BrE and AmE'.

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