Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. beachboy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 844
    #1

    future perfect - by

    By Sunday, she will have returned
    On Sunday, she will have returned.
    Is the second sentence right? Any difference between the two?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #2

    Re: future perfect - by

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    By Sunday, she will have returned
    On Sunday, she will have returned.
    Is the second sentence right? Any difference between the two?
    The second sentence is not correct.

  3. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Serbo-Croatian
      • Home Country:
      • Bosnia Herzegovina
      • Current Location:
      • Bosnia Herzegovina

    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 844
    #3

    Re: future perfect - by

    /A learner/

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    By Sunday, she will have returned
    On Sunday, she will have returned.
    Is the second sentence right? Any difference between the two?
    On Sunday, she will be returning.
    She is going to return on Monday.
    She will have returned by Tuesday.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 2,121
    #4

    Exclamation Re: future perfect - by

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    By Sunday, she will have returned. It means that her return will occur on or before Sunday.
    On Sunday, she will have returned. On Sunday, she will return. This is a general prediction about her return on Sunday.
    Is the second sentence right? Any difference between the two?
    Skp

  4. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #5

    Re: future perfect - by

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    By Sunday, she will have returned. It means that her return will occur on or before Sunday.
    On Sunday, she will have returned. On Sunday, she will return. This is a general prediction about her return on Sunday.
    If this is supposed to mean that the second is a good sentence, I'm going to have to agree with bhai. It's unnatural.
    However, there is a context in which it does make sense, and is natural:
    A: Are we making her itinerary too heavy for next Tuesday?
    B: No. She will have returned on Sunday, and spent Monday resting.
    Last edited by Raymott; 11-Nov-2010 at 08:14.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Will Future/Future continuous/Future perfect
    By Metathron in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 27-Jul-2008, 01:27
  2. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-Oct-2007, 20:23
  3. future continuous/future perfect, little+adj
    By silviasabater_2000 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Sep-2007, 16:15
  4. The use of Future Progressive and Future Perfect
    By miniwave in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Sep-2006, 14:20
  5. Difference b/w Future Simple & Future Perfect
    By Aroma in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Dec-2004, 09:34

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •