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    #1

    nip and tuck

    "I might make it to the airport, but it'll be nip and tuck." Did I use the phrase "nip and tuck" correctly in order to say that I might make it as well as I mightn't make it?

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    #2

    Re: nip and tuck

    Technically, yes. Broadly speaking the phrase refers to a close-run thing, a bit like it was 'neck and neck'. But (certainly in England) the phrase, '...touch and go...' would be more common in this context, even though a dictionary definition would suggest that this relates to extremely serious events.

    I might make it to the airport (on time), but it'll be touch and go...

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    #3

    Re: nip and tuck

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike2010 View Post
    Technically, yes. Broadly speaking the phrase refers to a close-run thing, a bit like it was 'neck and neck'. But (certainly in England) the phrase, '...touch and go...' would be more common in this context, even though a dictionary definition would suggest that this relates to extremely serious events.

    I might make it to the airport (on time), but it'll be touch and go...
    How about to say, "Two competitors were nip and tuck in the last lap of the race."?

  1. Munch's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: nip and tuck

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    How about to say, "Two competitors were nip and tuck in the last lap of the race."?
    That would sound quite unusual to me. I would expect to hear "neck and neck".

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    #5

    Re: nip and tuck

    Quote Originally Posted by Munch View Post
    That would sound quite unusual to me. I would expect to hear "neck and neck".
    What abou the first post?

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