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    #1

    subject to

    Dear all,

    In the paragraph below, is the use of "subject to" correct? Why isn't there a "is", or "which is" or some other verb in front of "subject to?

    "The premier told me that, subject to two things that the Dalia Lama has already said -- that he does not support the total independence of Tibet and that he renounces violence -- that he would be prepared to enter into dialogue with the Dalai Lama," Brown said."

    Thank you

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: subject to

    Quote Originally Posted by idiotmike View Post
    Dear all,

    In the paragraph below, is the use of "subject to" correct? Why isn't there a "is", or "which is" or some other verb in front of "subject to?

    "The premier told me that, subject to two things that the Dalia Lama has already said -- that he does not support the total independence of Tibet and that he renounces violence -- that he would be prepared to enter into dialogue with the Dalai Lama," Brown said."

    Thank you
    "The premier told me that he would be prepared to enter into dialogue with the Dalai Lama," Brown said." In saying that, he insisted that interpretation of his agreement should be regarded as "subject to two things that the Dalia Lama has already said: that he does not support the total independence of Tibet and that he renounces violence". It's an elided form that is widely used.

    b
    PS There is an extra 'that' in your text, but it's added for readability; this is often done in overlong sentences, especially in speech, to remind the listener of where the grammar's going. A better solution, in my view, would be to use shorter sentences.

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    #3

    Re: subject to

    Quote Originally Posted by idiotmike View Post
    Dear all,

    In the paragraph below, is the use of "subject to" correct? Why isn't there a "is", or "which is" or some other verb in front of "subject to?

    "The premier told me that, subject to two things that the Dalia Lama has already said -- that he does not support the total independence of Tibet and that he renounces violence -- that he would be prepared to enter into dialogue with the Dalai Lama," Brown said."

    Thank you

    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********


    Mike,

    You and I have learned a lot from the moderator's complete

    and elegant answer.

    May I -- as an ordinary speaker -- share my views?

    *****

    After checking my books and the Web, I have come to some

    conclusions (which, of course, may be completely wrong):

    (1) Yes, sometimes "subject" is an adjective and needs a verb.

    I made up these (bad) examples:

    Entrance to our school is subject to a background check on you.

    Entrance to our school, which is subject to a background check on you,

    is an easy process.

    (2) But sometimes the words "subject to" are a phrase. Some dictionaries

    call it an adverb; some call it an adjective; and at least one scholarly

    book calls it a preposition. I prefer "preposition."

    (3) To better analyze your sentence, I have simplified it:

    Subject to two things the Dalia Lama has already said, the

    premier would be prepared to enter into dialogue with him.

    The premier would be prepared, subject to two things the Dalai

    Lama has already said, to enter into dialogue with him.

    The premier would he prepared to enter into dialogue with him,


    subject to two things the Dalia Lama has already said.

    I most respectfully suggest that subject to two things the Dalai

    Lama has already said is a prepositional phrase that modifies the

    whole sentence. Usually an element that can be moved around is

    said to modify the whole thought.


    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********

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