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    #1

    no million-dollar

    Hi

    Two guys are talking. And one asks another.

    Why did you worker leave you? (He worked on a farm)

    He replied laughing: He just went moving on. It's not like I had him locked into no million-dollar long-term contract.

    I understand he's saying: He wasn't obliged to stay because he didn't sign a million-dollar long-term contract.

    However the word "no" before "million-dollar" is a bit strange to me? Does this word change the meaning of this sentence?

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    #2

    Re: no million-dollar

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    It's not like I had him locked into no million-dollar long-term contract.
    The sentence has a double negative, exactly the kind learners of English are told is wrong, wrong, wrong.

    As you can see, in live slang it vigorously emphasizes that there was NO long-term contract.

    But it should be avoided in any formal situation.
    Last edited by abaka; 12-Nov-2010 at 17:18.

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    #3

    Re: no million-dollar

    Hi

    So my interpretation was correct?

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    #4

    Re: no million-dollar

    Yes, you are right that he wasn't obliged to stay because he didn't sign a million-dollar long-term contract.

    But there is no strangeness here, nor does the double negative change the meaning; it just reinforces it.

    Sentences like this are not school-book English. But they are common enough.

    If you're going to speak in slang, you aren't going to worry about the finer points of logic. Nor should you.

    But that kind of talk does seem quite vulgar in a real business situation. Almost as though the person who said it is not very honest.

  1. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: no million-dollar

    Quote Originally Posted by abaka View Post
    But that kind of talk does seem quite vulgar in a real business situation. Almost as though the person who said it is not very honest.
    Or not very educated. I would say that this type of construction is not rare in some rural ares of the US.

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