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    #1

    3 questions, please

    1. He's been waiting for a good two hours.

    Could you tell me the meaning of "good" above?

    2. Are the following correct?

    a) Neither my friends or my parents are Catholic?

    b) Either my friends or my parents have been outside England.

    3. How to write this fraction in words? >>> 4(317/509)

    Thank you so much.
    Have a nice day ahead.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 3 questions, please

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    1. He's been waiting for a good two hours.

    Could you tell me the meaning of "good" above?

    It means "for a full two hours at least". You don't have the exact time, but you're asserting that it was at least two hours.

    2. Are the following correct?

    a) Neither my friends nor my parents are Catholic?
    Neither ... nor.

    b) Either my friends or my parents have been outside England.
    It's grammatically correct.


    3. How to write this fraction in words? >>> 4(317/509)
    You probably wouldn't write in words. You'd say it like this:
    "Four and three hundred and seventeen, five hundred and ninths." or
    "Four and three hundred and seventeen over five hundred and nine." or


    Thank you so much.
    Have a nice day ahead.
    R

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 3 questions, please

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    b) Either my friends or my parents have been outside England.


    Thank you so much.
    Have a nice day ahead.
    As Raymott said, it's grammatically correct, but do you know what it means?

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    #4

    Re: 3 questions, please

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    As Raymott said, it's grammatically correct, but do you know what it means?
    To me the sentence 'Either my friends or my parents have been outside England' seems not to make sense. Am I right?

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 3 questions, please

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    To me the sentence 'Either my friends or my parents have been outside England' seems not to make sense. Am I right?
    Either my friends or my parents have been outside England.

    If we accept that it makes sense, it can only be in these circumstances:

    Some people have been outside England. There are only two possibilities -


    My friends have been outside England.
    My parents have been outside England.

    One of these two statements is true. Once we know which, then the other is automatically not true.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: 3 questions, please

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Either my friends or my parents have been outside England.

    If we accept that it makes sense, it can only be in these circumstances:

    Some people have been outside England. There are only two possibilities -


    My friends have been outside England.
    My parents have been outside England.

    One of these two statements is true. Once we know which, then the other is automatically not true.
    That's why I merely said it was grammatically correct. No one would actually say it. Why would you?

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    #7

    Re: 3 questions, please

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    As Raymott said, it's grammatically correct, but do you know what it means?
    I can put my sentence in this context:

    Either my friends or my parents have been outside England. I'm fine with that because I'm already used to their being abroad.

    I would say it makes sense in this context.
    Thanks again.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: 3 questions, please

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    I can put my sentence in this context:

    Either my friends or my parents have been outside England. I'm fine with that because I'm already used to their being abroad.

    I would say it makes sense in this context.
    Thanks again.
    Not really (see below). But if you changed the tense, it might make a bit of sense:
    "Either my friends or my parents are always away from England. I'm fine with that because I'm used to being left alone."
    That sense is supposed to mean that, at any time, one of those groups (my friends or my parents) are away; not that only one group is always away, and the other group is always here (or in England, as the case seems to be).

    Your sentence still doesn't make sense in the context you've given, because it would include such scenarios as: your parents were outside England for a month, five years ago, and your friends have never been outside England.
    So, why would you be used to them being abroad? And why wouldn't you be fine with it?

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