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  1. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #1

    a point business-wise

    "Our society has kind of pushed us to a point business-wise where you don't really have a choice. You kind of have to use your computer all the time," said Dale Greer, a wine dealer who said he and his wife are considering having children.

    Hi, everybody!
    What does 'business-wise' mean in here? Can I read 'business-wise' as an adjective? If so, can I put it before 'point'?

    ......to a business-wise point where you don't really have a choice.

    Thanks a million!
    Xianyu

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a point business-wise

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    "Our society has kind of pushed us to a point business-wise where you don't really have a choice. You kind of have to use your computer all the time," said Dale Greer, a wine dealer who said he and his wife are considering having children.

    Hi, everybody!
    What does 'business-wise' mean in here? Can I read 'business-wise' as an adjective? If so, can I put it before 'point'? No.....read it as to a point in the world of business

    ......to a business-wise point where you don't really have a choice.

    Thanks a million!
    Xianyu
    Business-wise, in this context means in the area or world of business. This follows an annoying practice (IMO) of adding -wise to an existing word to create a neologism.

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    #3

    Re: a point business-wise

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    "Our society has kind of pushed us to a point business-wise where you don't really have a choice. You kind of have to use your computer all the time," said Dale Greer, a wine dealer who said he and his wife are considering having children.

    Hi, everybody!
    What does 'business-wise' mean in here? Can I read 'business-wise' as an adjective? If so, can I put it before 'point'?

    ......to a business-wise point where you don't really have a choice.

    Thanks a million!
    Xianyu

    ***** NOT A TEACHER / ONLY MY OPINION *****


    Xianyu,


    (1) I think that most books would classify noun + -wise as an

    adverb.

    (a) business-wise = as/so far as business is concerned, ...



    (2) I think that many (most?) writing teachers "go crazy"

    when their students write like this.

    (3) I think, however, that many ordinary people such as I like this short

    way to express an idea.

    (4) One book does not like: Pricewise, we have received no

    complaints. The book says it is better to say: No one has

    complained about our prices. I agree that the second sentence is

    "better" English, but I still like the first sentence -- especially in

    conversation.

    (5) For example (these are only my sentences):

    (a) Ms. X is 55 years old and unmarried. Her marriage prospects

    seem bleak (not too good).

    (b) Marriage-wise, Ms. X's prospects are not very bright.

    I think that (b) has more "punch" (vigor/strength).

    (6) Another book does not like a sentence such as:

    Drama-wise, the movie is pretty exciting.

    The book says there is already an adverb for "drama":

    The movie is dramatically exciting.

    OK, I guess that I agree with the book.

    (7) And yet another book dislikes sentences such as:

    Behaviorwise, her kids are awful.

    I guess the book wants you to write something like:

    Her kids have awful behavior.

    (8) I think that most books suggest that these -wise words

    should be at the front of the sentence:

    Business-wise [so/as far as business is concerned], our society has

    pushed us to a point where you don't really have a choice.

    If you want to put it in the middle, maybe (remember: this is only

    my opinion) it should be written:

    Our society has pushed us to the point where, business-wise, you

    don't really have a choice.

    Thank you

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    #4

    Re: a point business-wise

    I think business-wise is an adverb modifier of 'pushed'. I don't much care for 'a business-wise point'

  3. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: a point business-wise

    Thank everybody for your great help! I really appreciate it!

    Special thanks to TheParser for your detailed explanations.
    What you said is crystal clear. I've got it.

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