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    #1

    pull a beer

    "He asked a bar tender to pull him a beer." Can we say that to mean that someone pulls the handle to get beer out of a keg?
    Last edited by ostap77; 15-Nov-2010 at 11:55.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: pull a beer

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "He asked a bar tender to pull him a beer." Can we say that to mean that someone pulls the handle too get beer out of a keg?
    Yes, that's right.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: pull a beer

    "Pull a beer" to mean pouring beer from a keg or a tap in a pub is strictly BrE. In AmE "pull a beer" would confuse any native speaker. In AmE, if a patron is requesting a beer to be "pulled" ("on draft", rather than in a bottle), he would request his brew of choice to be "draft" or "on tap."

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    #4

    Re: pull a beer

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    "Pull a beer" to mean pouring beer from a keg or a tap in a pub is strictly BrE. In AmE "pull a beer" would confuse any native speaker. In AmE, if a patron is requesting a beer to be "pulled" ("on draft", rather than in a bottle), he would request his brew of choice to be "draft" or "on tap."
    What would you say than? "pour me a beer"?

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: pull a beer

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    What would you say than? "pour me a beer"?
    Yes, "pour me a beer" would be understood. However, in most cases if you made such a request the bartender would reply by asking "What'll you have?" or "What's your pleasure?" or some other phrase that required you to specify a specific brand of beer.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: pull a beer

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    "Pull a beer" to mean pouring beer from a keg or a tap in a pub is strictly BrE. ...

    'Fraid not. Draught beer (the word is related to 'drag') is pulled from the cask using a handle mounted on the bar-top; the handle is the lever of a pump, which [U]draws[/U the beer up from the keg (which could be either under the bar or in the cellar)]. You can get something marketed as 'draught beer' in individual cans, but that's just marketing!

    Incidentally, students may be interested to know that there's another use of 'pull' in this context. A person drinking something (often beer) can 'pull at' it or 'take a pull' at it.

    b

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    #7

    Re: pull a beer

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    'Fraid not. Draught beer (the word is related to 'drag') is pulled from the cask using a handle mounted on the bar-top; the handle is the lever of a pump, which [U]draws[/U the beer up from the keg (which could be either under the bar or in the cellar)]. You can get something marketed as 'draught beer' in individual cans, but that's just marketing!

    Incidentally, students may be interested to know that there's another use of 'pull' in this context. A person drinking something (often beer) can 'pull at' it or 'take a pull' at it.

    b
    I may have described the actual pulling process incorrectly, but my point was that "pulling a beer" or "pull me one" is strictly BrE. In AmE, even when asking for a draft beer (that is, one that is not canned or bottled) one would not refer to "pulling" it.

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