Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 379
    #1

    Post having somebody do/doing something

    Dear friend,

    When we want to make somebody do something or persuade them to do something, do we use 'have them do' or 'have them doing' it?

    for example, do we say "I won't have you smoking at your age" or "I won't have you smoke at your age"? Thank you!

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: having somebody do/doing something

    Quote Originally Posted by Heidi View Post
    Dear friend,

    When we want to make somebody do something or persuade them to do something, do we use 'have them do' or 'have them doing' it?

    for example, do we say "I won't have you smoking at your age" or "I won't have you smoke at your age"? Thank you!
    There are at least two different constructions involved here.

    1. You can cause someone to do something:

    I will have the mechanic look at my car.
    I will have John come to see you tomorrow


    This is a little formal.

    2. You can cause something to be done.

    I will have my car repaired.
    I will have the matter looked into.



    3. You can express the idea that you will not tolerate something.

    I will not have dogs digging up my garden.
    I won't have you smoking at your age.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •