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    #1

    Like vs. as

    Pledging of usufruct is treated like/as a transfer.

    I think "like" is correct, but I'm not sure. "Like" is followed by a pronoun, which is the case here, so it should be correct.

    Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: Like vs. as

    I'm not sure what that word is, but I would use "as" in your sentence if you record it the same way, and "like" if you mean you follow basically the same procedure.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: Like vs. as

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I'm not sure what that word is, but I would use "as" in your sentence if you record it the same way, and "like" if you mean you follow basically the same procedure.
    Let me try to give you a clearer example.

    A transfer is a handover of shares to an individual.

    Y shall be treated like/as a transfer if it meets the following conditions.

    I think only "like" is correct.

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    #4

    Re: Like vs. as

    I'd use "as." Let's see what others say.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: Like vs. as

    Jasmin, why do you think "as" is incorrect?

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    #6

    Re: Like vs. as

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I'd use "as." Let's see what others say.
    This 'other' agrees.

    I would treat it as if it were a transfer rather than similar to a transfer.

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    #7

    Re: Like vs. as

    "Like" precedes a noun, whereas if what follows is a clause, one uses "as." I think that's the rule when it comes to using "like" and "as."

    But perhaps there are exceptions. To be honest, "as" sounded more natural to me in the example I provided, but using "as" would run counter to the rule I just described.

    Here's another example.

    "All the questions must be answered with a 'yes' for tax treatment as an administrative company to be possible."

    Here, too, "as" sounds better, but since what follows is a noun, "like" should be used. Or maybe "an administrative company to be possible" is a clause and "like" is correct.

    I'm confused.

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    #8

    Re: Like vs. as

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    "Like" precedes a noun, whereas if what follows is a clause, one uses "as." I think that's the rule when it comes to using "like" and "as."
    I don't think there is such a rule. "As" can be a preposition too. There is a rule (which is not obeyed by every English writer) that "like" cannot be used as a conjunction. ("He does it like he should.")

    I think there's a difference in meaning between the two treated as prepositions (but there is some overlap). "As" generally introduces a role of something ("He serves as president.") and "like" generally introduces something to which something else is similar.

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    #9

    Re: Like vs. as

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I don't think there is such a rule.
    I have two grammar books at home, one by Pat O'Connor and the other by Bryan Garner, that say there is such a rule.

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    #10

    Re: Like vs. as

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    I have two grammar books at home, one by Pat O'Connor and the other by Bryan Garner, that say there is such a rule.
    Birdeen is right. O'Connor and Garner are wrong, though even the normally infallible Michael Swan writes," Like is similar to a preposition. We use it before a noun or pronoun. [...] As is a conjunction. We use it before a clause, and before an expression beginning with a preposition."

    However, Swan later tells us, "Another use of as is to say what function a person or thing has - what jobs people do, what purpose things are used for, what category they belong to, etc. In this case as is used like* a preposition, before a noun: [...]

    Please don't use that knife as a screwdriver."


    *
    I think this like should be as!

    Interestingly, even the Oxford ALD is slightly confusing. In its usage advice box it says virtually what Garner and O'Connor say, and informs us that "AS is a conjunction and an adverb", but in the definitions colums, the first section gives as as a preposition.

    Swan, Michael (1995) Practical English Usage, Oxford: OUP
    Wehmeier, Sally (ed.) (2000) Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, Oxford: OUP

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