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      • Native Language:
      • Polish
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    • Join Date: Feb 2010
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    #1

    nor? or?

    Hello,

    My English teacher tells me that I am not allowed to say:
    'There is no possibility to create X nor Y'

    but instead I have to say:
    'There is no possibility to create X or Y'.

    But at the same time she says that the sentence:
    'There is no option to do X nor to do Y' is correct.

    The problem is I cannot see the difference.

    Please, help me. Thank you:)
    E.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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      • England
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      • Czech Republic

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    #2

    Re: nor? or?

    Quote Originally Posted by eFFcia View Post
    Hello,

    My English teacher tells me that I am not allowed to say:
    '1. There is no possibility to create X nor Y'

    but instead I have to say:
    2. 'There is no possibility to create X or Y'.

    But at the same time she says that the sentence:
    3. 'There is no option to do X nor to do Y' is correct.

    The problem is I cannot see the difference.
    nor has the approximate idea of and no(t).

    Your teacher is therefore right about #1 and #2.
    #1 would mean: There is no possibility to create X and not to create Y.
    #2 means: There is no possibility to create either X or Y.

    #3 sounds a little strange, but is acceptable. It means: There is no option to do X and there is no option to do Y.

    I would say: There is no option to do either X or Y.

    • Member Info
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      • Current Location:
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    #3

    Re: nor? or?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    nor has the approximate idea of and no(t).

    Your teacher is therefore right about #1 and #2.
    #1 would mean: There is no possibility to create X and not to create Y.
    #2 means: There is no possibility to create either X or Y.

    #3 sounds a little strange, but is acceptable. It means: There is no option to do X and there is no option to do Y.

    I would say: There is no option to do either X or Y.
    I am sorry but I still do not understand.
    Why do you say:
    #3 means: 'There is no option to do X and there is no option to do Y'
    but not
    #1 means 'There is no possibility to create X and there is no possibility to create Y'?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: nor? or?

    Quote Originally Posted by eFFcia View Post
    I am sorry but I still do not understand.
    Why do you say:
    #3 means: 'There is no option to do X and there is no option to do Y'
    but not
    #1 means 'There is no possibility to create X and there is no possibility to create Y'?
    #1 is not an acceptable utterance. The reason is that if it meant something (and it doesn't), the meaning would be something like:

    There is no possibility to create X and (simultaneously) not to create Y.

    A similar example might be:

    At this college it is not possible to study French and not study Italian.

    This would be far better expressed as:

    If you want to study French you have to study Italian.

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