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    #1

    from .... to(inclusive)

    Your stint starts from May to September.
    Your stint starts from May to September inclusive.

    If the preposition "to" has the sense of inclusion, may I know the reason why sometimes the word "inclusive" is put at the end of the sentence?

    Thank you very much indeed again...

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    #2

    Re: from .... to(inclusive)

    Your sentences need to be rephrased.

    'Your stint starts in May and ends in September.'

    'Your stint is from May to September inclusive.'

    Even then, they are not precise enough.

    You need to stipulate the dates more clearly:

    'Your stint is from 1st May to 30th September.'

    'Your stint is the months of May to September inclusive.'

    Inclusive means including both of the months stated.

    It is usually used for dates rather than months:

    'I am available from 1st May to 30th September inclusive.' This means
    I am available on 1st May and 30th September and all the days in between.

    Rover

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    #3

    Re: from .... to(inclusive)

    Your stint starts from May to September. Is ambiguous, which is why we add 'inclusive'
    Your stint starts from May to September inclusive. Your stint includes September, doesn't end at teh end of August.

    Americans do this better: May thru September: the months May, June, July, August and September are meant. (Tell me if I'm wrong, as I don't speak American)

  1. Munch's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: from .... to(inclusive)

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    Your stint starts from May to September inclusive.
    Setting aside ambiguity, does this sentence sound natural to you Pedroski? I agree with what Rover_KE said above – you shouldn’t say “starts from May to September”, because nothing starts “from May to September”, it only starts “from May” and ends “in September”.

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    #5

    Re: from .... to(inclusive)

    Quote Originally Posted by Munch View Post
    Setting aside ambiguity, does this sentence sound natural to you Pedroski? I agree with what Rover_KE said above – you shouldn’t say “starts from May to September”, because nothing starts “from May to September”, it only starts “from May” and ends “in September”.

    'Starts from XXX to XXX' is common and normal in Chinese, but maybe it is not so in other languages.

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: from .... to(inclusive)

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    Your stint starts from May to September. Is ambiguous, which is why we add 'inclusive'
    Your stint starts from May to September inclusive. Your stint includes September, doesn't end at teh end of August.

    Americans do this better: May thru September: the months May, June, July, August and September are meant. (Tell me if I'm wrong, as I don't speak American)
    You're right. We would say that your stint is from May through September or from May 1st through September 30th.

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    #7

    Re: from .... to(inclusive)

    I see what you mean about sounding funny, but no, it does not sound funny to me. There seems to be a missing 'and goes' before 'to', which would also remove any ambiguity. I think people normally say it without the 'and goes'

    'from here to there' is a common phrase too
    'from Tuesday(s) to Saturday(s)' You could change 'to' for 'until' or 'till'

    Majority rules: if the Chinese say it that way, it must be right!! Hahaha!

  3. Munch's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: from .... to(inclusive)

    Just to be clear, it is the “starts from” that makes it sound incorrect to me. These phrases from your post are fine without “starts”, so they don't seem relevant to me:
    'from here to there'
    'from Tuesday(s) to Saturday(s)'

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    #9

    Re: from .... to(inclusive)

    Oh, I didn't realize that was what you meant. I don't think 'starts from' is at all unusual. Look it up: search "starts from January" or any combination you like.

    You have to start from somewhere, even in Japan!! Why do you find it strange?

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    #10

    Re: from .... to(inclusive)

    Because you only start once. You can't start continuously for five months.

    You don't start from May though September. You start in May or you start on May 1.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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