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  1. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #1

    left realising VS. realised

    David Cameron, UK prime minister, went to China leading a coalition government and a large delegation of British business figures, hoping to do business. He left realising that achieving big export deals with China is a slow and difficult process, even though he spoke softly on human rights and avoided gaffes.

    Hi, everybody!
    Can 'realised' substitute for the part in red without changing its meanings?

    Thanks a million!

    Xianyu

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: left realising VS. realised

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    David Cameron, UK prime minister, went to China leading a coalition government and a large delegation of British business figures, hoping to do business. He left realising that achieving big export deals with China is a slow and difficult process, even though he spoke softly on human rights and avoided gaffes.


    Can 'realised' substitute for the part in red without changing its meanings?

    No
    5

  3. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: left realising VS. realised

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    5
    Thank you, fivejedjon. Could you please explain why to me?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: left realising VS. realised

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    Thank you, fivejedjon. Could you please explain why to me?
    I was afraid you'd ask me that.

    The present participle used in this way normally has an active meaning, the past participle a passive meaning:

    Sparta played Slavia yesterday, beating them six-nil.
    Sparta beat Slavia
    The Slavia team slunk off the pitch, beaten and ashamed.
    The Slavia team were beaten and ashamed.

    In your example, by the time Cameron left, he realised (active) that ...

  5. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: left realising VS. realised

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I was afraid you'd ask me that.

    The present participle used in this way normally has an active meaning, the past participle a passive meaning:

    Sparta played Slavia yesterday, beating them six-nil. Sparta beat Slavia
    The Slavia team slunk off the pitch, beaten and ashamed. The Slavia team were beaten and ashamed.

    In your example, by the time Cameron left, he realised (active) that ...
    He left realising that achieving big export deals with China is a slow and difficult process, even though he spoke softly on human rights and avoided gaffes.
    Fivejedjon, thank you so much for your great help, but I have the LAST question.
    Can I think that the clause with the present participle functions as an adverbial modifier, which modifies 'left'?

    I wish you wouldn't be afraid of my last question.

    Have a nice day!
    Xianyu

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: left realising VS. realised

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    I have the one LAST question.
    Can I think that the clause with the present participle functions as an adverbial modifier, which modifies 'left'?

    I wish hope you wouldn't won't be afraid of my last question.
    I believe so, but I am not confident about my clause analysis. Let's see if someody else has an opinion.

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    #7

    Re: left realising VS. realised

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    Fivejedjon, thank you so much for your great help, but I have the LAST question.
    Can I think that the clause with the present participle functions as an adverbial modifier, which modifies 'left'?

    I wish you wouldn't be afraid of my last question.

    Have a nice day!
    Xianyu


    ***** NOT A TEACHER / ONLY MY OPINION


    Xianyu,

    While you and I are waiting for some teachers to give us the answer,

    may I share what I was able to find.

    (1) For easier analysis, I shall use this sentence:

    The prime minister left China, realizing that securing trade deals is a most

    delicate process.

    (2) In my opinion only, I think that many high school teachers would

    be delighted if their students could:

    (a) identify the subject of the participle as "the prime minister."

    (b) identify "the prime minister" as the noun that is being modified

    by the participial phrase.

    (3) I believe, however, that there are many teachers and books that

    agree with YOU: sometimes the participial phrase modifies

    not only the noun but also the verb.

    (4) One teacher, with whom I communicated, gave me this quotation

    from Modern English by Ms. Marcella Frank:

    Some grammarians classify nonrestrictive participial phrases

    as adverbials because of their ability to occupy the three

    adverbial positions. ...[They can be] regarded as modifying

    either the verb or more commonly the entire sentence.



    (5) Finally, I received tremendous help from English Review Grammar

    by Mr. Walter Kay Smart. (Because of copyright laws, I can mention

    only a few things from his book.)

    (a) Mr. Smart writes:

    Some participial phrases have a peculiar dual function: the participle

    which introduces the phrase is an adjective modifying the noun, but

    the whole phrase is an adverb modifying a verb.

    (b) Mr. Smart then gives this sentence:

    They ran down the street, shouting and waving their hats.

    (i) Mr. Smart gives that sentence as an example of "dual

    function" and classifies it as indicating "accompanying

    circumstances." That is (in his words):

    Certain actions or circumstances that occur at the same time

    as the action represented by the verb.

    Maybe your sentence means something like:

    The prime minister left China at the same time that [those five

    words are called a conjunction by Professor George O. Curme]

    he realized that securing trade deals is a most delicate process."

    * Practice Exercises in Everyday English by Robert J. Dixson seems to

    support my idea. He says, "Very often such participial constructions are

    really substitutes for adverbial clauses." In other words, "realizing ...

    delicate process" may be a substitute for the more formal

    "at the same time that he realized that securing trade deals

    is a most delicate process."





    Thank you so much for asking that question. Participles always

    confuse me. It is often hard to know what they modify. Doing

    research for your question helped me to better understand my own

    language.
    Last edited by TheParser; 21-Nov-2010 at 12:50.

  7. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: left realising VS. realised

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER / ONLY MY OPINION


    Xianyu,

    While you and I are waiting for some teachers to give us the answer,

    may I share what I was able to find.

    (1) For easier analysis, I shall use this sentence:

    The prime minister left China, realizing that securing trade deals is a most

    delicate process.

    (2) In my opinion only, I think that many high school teachers would

    be delighted if their students could:

    ......
    Dear TheParser, thank you so much! ))))))))
    Crystal clear!
    You are amazing! I've learnt a lot from your replies. Hugging you if you don't mind.

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