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    #1

    Meanwhile

    Meanwhile, news crews spent the day massed outside London’s various royal palaces, interviewing royal experts who speculated on things like where and when the wedding would take place and what kind of charities Miss Middleton would support.
    Dear all,

    I ran into the quoted sentence while reading New York Times. And I am curious to know whether I can recast the following without changing its meaning like the blue one:

    Original: She spent four years studying for her law degree. Meanwhile, she continued to work at the bank.

    Recast: Meanwhile she spent four years continued to work at the bank, studying for her law degree.

    Could you please explain to me? Thanks.


    LQZ

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    #2

    Re: Meanwhile

    "Continued" is wrong. The past participle used as an adjective is passive -- it says someone or something made a continuation on her, which is nonsense.

    "Continuing to work" is at least grammatically correct. But in fact the present participle by itself has the continuous sense you want:

    Meanwhile she spent four years working at the bank while studying for her law degree.

    Here "while" has its original and full meaning "at the same time as". It perfectly indicates that for four years she juggled work and study.

    I've left the word "meanwhile" at the beginning of the sentence under the assumption that just before this sentence, the text mentioned
    other things were happening in her life during the time she was working and studying: she was seeing William. But if that's not the case, and the text makes no such mention, strike out "meanwhile" as elegant but unnecessary.

    She spent four years working at the bank while studying for her law degree.

    The comma after "bank" is not necessary.

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    #3

    Re: Meanwhile

    Quote Originally Posted by abaka View Post
    "Continued" is wrong. The past participle used as an adjective is passive -- it says someone or something made a continuation on her, which is nonsense.

    "Continuing to work" is at least grammatically correct. But in fact the present participle by itself has the continuous sense you want:

    Meanwhile she spent four years working at the bank while studying for her law degree.

    Here "while" has its original and full meaning "at the same time as". It perfectly indicates that for four years she juggled work and study.

    I've left the word "meanwhile" at the beginning of the sentence under the assumption that just before this sentence, the text mentioned
    other things were happening in her life during the time she was working and studying: she was seeing William. But if that's not the case, and the text makes no such mention, strike out "meanwhile" as elegant but unnecessary.

    She spent four years working at the bank while studying for her law degree.

    The comma after "bank" is not necessary.
    Thank you, abaka.

    I have one more question: how do you think the sentence I took from the New York Times? Is it grammartically wrong? Is "massed" a past participle also?

    Meanwhile, news crews spent the day massed outside Londonís various royal palaces, interviewing royal experts who speculated on things like where and when the wedding would take place and what kind of charities Miss Middleton would support.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Meanwhile

    Quote Originally Posted by LQZ View Post
    Dear all,

    I ran into the quoted sentence while reading New York Times. And I am curious to know whether I can recast the following without changing its meaning like the blue one:

    Original: She spent four years studying for her law degree. Meanwhile, she continued to work at the bank.

    Recast: Meanwhile she spent four years continueding to work at the bank, studying for her law degree.

    Could you please explain to me? Thanks.
    Even with my 'improvement', your sentence is unacceptable. Meanwhile means approximately: At/during the time just mentioned, while this is/was happening. Your sentence is just about possible only if the meanwhile is preceded by a situation to which it refers, such as: She wrote three novels and had two children before her 23rd birthday.

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