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    • Join Date: Nov 2010
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    #1

    Participle contructions

    Hello to all of you, this is my first thred here.

    I have some questions concerning an English test of my 10th grade students. They were supposed to rewrite sentences using participle constructions and a lot of them had something different in mind than the sample solution I'd have preferred.
    There are some sentences I'm not sure aboutm, whether the students' solutions are correct as well, so I'd like to read some comments on it.

    They had eaten healthy, so they didnít have any problems when they grew older
    Solution: Having eaten healthy, they didnít have any problems when they grew older.
    I guess "Eating healthy..." is not possible?

    In the show we saw leopards. They overcame an obstacle.
    Solution: In the show we saw leopards overcoming an obstacle.
    Questionable: In the show we saw leopards overcome an obstacle.

    "Didn't knowing" is always wrong, I suppose; you have to use "Not knowing" in this case. Correct?

    The woman watched TV. She speaks English very well.
    Solution: The woman watching TV speaks English very well.
    I know there is sometimes a slight difference when you change word order. So what about "The woman speaking English very well watches TV."?

    Similar question in the following sentence:
    Grandma sat in an armchair. She listened to her new CD.
    Solution: Grandma sat in an armchair, listening to her new CD.
    What about the following: Listening to her new CD, Grandma sat in an armchair
    Sitting in an armchair Grandma listened to her new CD.
    Grandma listened to her new CD, sitting in an armchair.

    Mr Smith was very angry. He insulted the neighbor.
    Solution: Being very angry, Mr Smith insulted the neighbor.
    Is "Insulting the neighbor, Mr Smith was very angry" possible as well?


    I will appreiciate any feedback on this. Thanks in advance.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Participle contructions

    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic Phoenix View Post
    Hello to all of you, this is my first thread here.

    Welcome to the forum.

    I have some questions concerning an English test of my 10th grade students. They were supposed to rewrite sentences using participle constructions and a lot of them had something different in mind than the sample solution I'd have preferred.
    There are some sentences where/in which I'm not sure about
    m whether the students' solutions are correct as well, so I'd like to read some comments on it.

    They had eaten healthy, so they didnít have any problems when they grew older
    Solution: Having eaten healthy, they didnít have any problems when they grew older.
    I guess "Eating healthy..." is not possible? Not really, though you'll see it. Incidentally, I am old-fashioned enough to prefer 'eating healthily', though I accept that many people today 'eat healthy'.

    In the show we saw leopards. They overcame an obstacle.
    Solution: In the show we saw leopards overcoming an obstacle.
    Questionable: In the show we saw leopards overcome an obstacle.

    There are different overtones to the two, but both are correct.

    "Didn't knowing" is always wrong, I suppose;Yes you have to use "Not knowing" in this case. Correct? I assume so, but I'd like to see your sentence.

    The woman watched TV. She speaks English very well.
    Solution: 1. The woman watching TV speaks English very well.
    I know there is sometimes a slight difference when you change word order. So what about 2. "The woman speaking English very well watche
    sd TV."?

    In #1 the speaker is telling us which woman speaks English very well;
    in #2 the speaker is telling us which woman watched TV


    Similar question in the following sentence:
    Grandma sat in an armchair. She listened to her new CD.
    Solution: 1. Grandma sat in an armchair, listening to her new CD.
    What about the following:2. Listening to her new CD, Grandma sat in an armchair
    3. Sitting in an armchair Grandma listened to her new CD.
    4. Grandma listened to her new CD, sitting in an armchair.

    No real difference.I don't think I'd say #2, but I don't think that is significant.

    Mr Smith was very angry. He insulted the neighbor.
    Solution: 1. Being very angry, Mr Smith insulted the neighbor.
    Is 2. "Insulting the neighbor, Mr Smith was very angry" possible as well?


    In #1 I'd omit the 'being', but it's possible to use it.
    #2 sounds very unlikely to me. I am assuming that Mr S was angry before he insulted the neighbour. #2 suggests to me that he became anry during the insulting.

    5


    • Join Date: Nov 2010
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    #3

    Re: Participle contructions

    Thanks, fivejedjon, that was quite helpful.

    The sentence you referred to is "Although they didn’t know each other, they got to be friends". I'm quite sure you cannot say "Didn't knowing each other..."

    There is another tricky one
    The boy plays the drums. He came from Africa last year.
    Solution: The boy playing the drums came from Africa last year.

    Is "The boy coming from Africa last year plays the drums" correct, too

    By the way, not sure what the number 5 means at the end of your reply.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
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    #4

    Re: Participle contructions

    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic Phoenix View Post
    Thanks, fivejedjon, that was quite helpful.

    The sentence you referred to is "Although they didnít know each other, they got to be friends". I'm quite sure you cannot say "Didn't knowing each other..." You are right. It would have to be: Despite not knowing... It sounds strange to me, though. If they didn't know each other, how did they become friends.?

    There is another tricky one
    The boy plays the drums. He came from Africa last year.
    Solution: The boy playing the drums came from Africa last year.

    Actually this is correct only if the boy is playing the drums at the moment of speaking. I should have picked this up with your previous example:

    The woman watched TV. She speaks English very well.
    Solution: The woman watching TV speaks English very well.
    This is not an exact alternative to the two previous sentences. Sorry I didn't spot that before.

    Is "The boy coming from Africa last year plays the drums" correct, too No


    By the way, not sure what the number 5 means at the end of your reply. When we press QUOTE to reply to your question, we have to type in at least one letter after the quoted material before we can submit the reply. I used to write my full UE name, fivejedjon, then shortened it to 5jj and then just 5
    5

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