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    #1

    distinction

    Hi,

    I wonder if anyone can tell me what these two distinction mean in the following two sentences, I looked up in some dictionaries but I can't find an answer, if the sentences in itself make no sense, just let me know, thanks beforehand.


    1.He is a writer of real distinction.



    2.He has gained a distinction in various fields of scholarly studies.


    Yours

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    #2

    Re: distinction

    Hello,

    I'm just guessing but I think that the first one must refer to some kind of fame, talent the writer has got.
    The second one is, IMO, referring to a reward, a person earned while studying.

    Dood.
    -----
    Not a teacher's opinion.

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    #3

    Re: distinction

    Anyone can help?

    Thanks

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: distinction

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    Hi,

    I wonder if anyone can tell me what these two distinction mean in the following two sentences, I looked up in some dictionaries but I can't find an answer, if the sentences in itself make no sense, just let me know, thanks beforehand.


    1.He is a writer of real distinction.
    He has 'the quality of being excellent or important' - Oxford ALD


    2.He has gained a distinction in various fields of scholarly studies.
    We normally gain 'a distinction' in one particular subject/examination:

    I got my results yesterday. I passed (in) Physics and Biology and got a distinction in Maths.

    Your sentence sounds strange as it stands.
    5

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    #5

    Re: distinction

    Thanks a lot, five.

    Do you mean the second sentence sounds strange or both sound strange?

    Yours

    Silver

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: distinction

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    Do you mean the second sentence sounds strange or both sound strange?
    Sorry if I wasn't clear. Your first sentence is fine, the second sounds strange.

    The best I can do for the second is to suggest: He is distinguished in various fields of scholarly studies.

    If you are lucky, Barb_D will drop in on this thread, and you'll get a writer's thoughts on a better version.

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    #7

    Re: distinction

    Your idea is as valuable as his.

    My dear friend.

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    #8

    Re: distinction

    fivejedjon wrote

    1.He is a writer of real distinction.
    He has 'the quality of being excellent or important' - Oxford ALD


    2.He has gained a distinction in various fields of scholarly studies.
    We normally gain 'a distinction' in one particular subject/examination
    As you might expect, the meanings are related. People talk about 'getting a distinction', but on the actual certificate of someone who did, it reads 'This is to certify that Jo Bloggs passed with distinction' (or something like that).

    b

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    #9

    Re: distinction

    At Australian universities, the grades are:
    1, 2: Fail;
    3: Conceded Pass;
    4: Pass;
    5: Credit;
    6: Distinction;
    7: High Distinction.
    So, you could say,"He gained Distinctions in various fields of his scholarly studies." But this use is very concrete. It means he achieved 6+ on a 7-point scale in various fields.
    It's more likely to mean: "He has gained a distinction in various fields of scholarly studies", which is a similar meaning to 1.

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