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    #1

    Unhappy Is my teacher right?

    I am a junior high school student in Osaka, Japan.

    My English teacher told us to learn several sentences last week.
    But I feel something is wrong with two of them.
    But I don't know how to correct them.

    The two sentences are like this.
    1. It is liquid cleaning hair. (shampoo)
    2. The teachers who stand there are our teachers.

    (I think the latter may be correct but sounds wordy.)

    I asked her, the teacher, about this. But she said there are no problem with them.

    How do these sentences sound to naitive speakers?
    Are they sound natural?

    Thank you very much for your help in advance.

  1. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Is my teacher right?

    Quote Originally Posted by shuei View Post
    I am a junior high school student in Osaka, Japan.

    My English teacher told us to learn several sentences last week.
    But I feel something is wrong with two of them,
    but I don't know how to correct them.

    The two sentences are: like this.
    1. It is liquid cleaning hair. (shampoo) It is shampoo.
    2. The teachers who stand there are our teachers. They are our teachers standing there.

    (I think the latter may be correct but sounds wordy.)Grammatically correct, but awkward.

    I asked her, the teacher, about this, but she said there are no problems with them.

    How do these sentences sound to naitive speakers?
    Are Do they sound natural? No

    Thank you very much for your help in advance.

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    #3

    Re: Is my teacher right?

    Quote Originally Posted by shuei View Post
    I am a junior high school student in Osaka, Japan.

    My English teacher told us to learn several sentences last week.
    But I feel something is wrong with two of them.
    But I don't know how to correct them.

    The two sentences are like this.
    1. It is liquid cleaning hair. (shampoo)
    2. The teachers who stand there are our teachers.

    (I think the latter may be correct but sounds wordy.)

    I asked her, the teacher, about this. But she said there are no problem with them.

    How do these sentences sound to naitive speakers?
    Are they sound natural?

    Thank you very much for your help in advance.
    ***** A NON-TEACHER'S OPINION *****


    Shuei,

    Yes, you are correct. As Riquecohen said, they do not sound

    natural to native speakers.

    (1) Maybe your teacher meant:

    It is hair-cleaning liquid.

    I think that it is grammatically correct to express the idea of shampoo

    that way, but no one would speak that way.

    (2) Maybe we could change No. 2 to:

    The teachers standing there are ours.


    Thank you

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Is my teacher right?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** A NON-TEACHER'S OPINION *****



    (2) Maybe we could change No. 2 to:

    The teachers standing there are ours.
    This is a better suggestion than mine.

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    #5

    Re: Is my teacher right?

    I think the second sentence is much less awkward than the first, isn't it? I think I can imagine someone saying that in some very specific situation. I can't imagine anyone uttering the first one.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Is my teacher right?

    If you mean that no one would ever say that it's liquid cleaning hair, you are absolutely right. Hair doesn't do much cleaning -- mostly it does a lot of clogging.

    Even calling it liquid hair-cleaner is awkward. We refer to washing our hair, not cleaning it.

    Shampoo is the liquid soap used to wash hair.

    As for the second, I could possibly imagine it as an answer to the question "Which ones are your teachers?" but I would find "Our teachers are the ones standing over there" a more natural response.

    EDITED to fix an OMG-embarrassing typo
    Last edited by Barb_D; 23-Nov-2010 at 04:35.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. euncu's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Is my teacher right?

    Well, I'd not use teachers-teachers either but is there anyone who thinks that there may be some instances where the sentence may sound natural? For instance, if you are very proud that your teachers are ones of the best teachers who you get to learn from, don't you say; The teachers who stand there are my teachers with an emphasis on the word "my" ?

    Thanks for your replies in advance.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Is my teacher right?

    Quote Originally Posted by euncu View Post
    Well, I'd not use teachers-teachers either but is there anyone who thinks that there may be some instances where the sentence may sound natural? For instance, if you are very proud that your teachers are ones of the best teachers who you get to learn from, don't you say; The teachers who stand there are my teachers with an emphasis on the word "my" ?

    Thanks for your replies in advance.
    It's possible to make up situations in which one could say almost anything. Pointing to a stage on which teachers stand during assemblies, a student could say, "The teachers who stand there are John's teachers, the teachers who stand there are my teachers...," etc.

    However, for all normal situations, it is not unreasonable to say that shuei's sentence is not acceptable English. Parser's final suggestion is much more natural and likely.

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    #9

    Re: Is my teacher right?

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    Thank you for correcting MY English too!

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    #10

    Re: Is my teacher right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If you mean that no one would ever say that it's liquid cleaning hair, you are absolutely right. Hair doesn't do much cleaning -- mostly it does a lot of clogging.

    Even calling it liquid hair-cleaner is awkward. We refer to washing our hair, not cleaning it.

    Shampoo is the liquid soap used to wash hair.

    As for the second, I could possibly imagine it as an answer to the question "Which ones are your teachers?" but I would find "Our teachers are the ones standing over there" a more natural response.

    EDITED to fix an OMG-embarrassing typo
    Thank you very much for helping me!

    Hair does not clean, but it clogs.

    I first thought of a strange liquid creature trying to clean our hair
    when I heard the first sentence.

    Now I feel relieved thanks to you all.
    English is difficult but interesting.

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