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  1. jessica.permatasari's Avatar
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    #1

    Question what's wrong?

    I wrote an invitation and (my mistake) I wrote "Join with us"
    I thought that my mistake is only about grammar. It should be "Join us", right?
    But, someone told me that it has a negative meaning. Actually what's wrong with "Join with us"? What's the meaning?

    Help me please...
    Thanks a bunch b4..

    • Member Info
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    #2

    Re: what's wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by jessica.permatasari View Post
    I wrote an invitation and (my mistake) I wrote "Join with us"
    I thought that my mistake is only about grammar. It should be "Join us", right?
    But, someone told me that it has a negative meaning. Actually what's wrong with "Join with us"? What's the meaning?

    Help me please...
    Thanks a bunch b4..

    ***** A NON-TEACHER'S OPINION *****


    Ms. Permatasari,


    I had never thought much about this matter until I read your

    nice post.

    I have checked my dictionaries at home and various online dictionaries.

    I have some ideas for you to consider.

    (1) You wrote an invitation. Probably most "experts" would

    suggest that you simply write:

    Please join us on Saturday for Bob's birthday party.

    Most dictionaries explain that if the sense of your sentence

    means "everyone else will do it," then do not use "with."

    Many dictionaries give examples similar to:

    Won't you please join me in welcoming our distinguished guest.

    I join my wife in thanking you for that wonderful gift.

    *****

    (2) You do use "with" if the sense of your sentence is

    "let's work together."

    For example:

    Residents have joined with the police to reduce crime in the area.

    I hope you will join with us in the campaign to cure this horrible disease.

    I found the Longman Online dictionary to be most helpful in my research.


    Thank you again for the question. I learned something today that I

    had not known.

    Have a nice day.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: what's wrong?

    Hi, and welcome to the forums.

    There is no negative meaning. If you really care, you can ask the person who said that what he or she meant by saying so. Otherwise, just ignore that comment and enjoy your party.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. jessica.permatasari's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: what's wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Hi, and welcome to the forums.

    There is no negative meaning. If you really care, you can ask the person who said that what he or she meant by saying so. Otherwise, just ignore that comment and enjoy your party.
    I did it...
    He didn't explain more about that, so I just ignored it (at that time).
    But after I arrived home, I start to think about it. --> late response
    lol~

  4. jessica.permatasari's Avatar
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    #5

    Wink Re: what's wrong?

    TheParser, thanks for the explanation.
    From your explanation, I don't see there's any negative meaning. Am I right?
    They only have a difference.

    Thanks so much once again that I know the difference now.
    I can use those words appropriately.



    ^.^

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