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    #1

    Lightbulb help me to place dialects

    I'm writing about dialects of Great Britain. I found in a book 3 examples of dialect to say She is not coming:

    • She bain't a comin
    • Hoo inno comin
    • Her idden comin


    but I would place these expressions to the respective region of G.B. and I found only that
    • She bain't coming - is spoken in the westcountry (is it true?)
    • Hoo inno coming - is a rural dialect... BUT WHERE?
    • her idden comin - where is it spoken?


    Also,what are the differences between
    • she's not coming
    • she isn't coming
    • She ani't coming

    ???

    Thanks for your answers!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: help me to place dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by pandora88 View Post
    I'm writing about dialects of Great Britain. I found in a book 3 examples of dialect to say She is not coming:


    • She bain't a comin
    • Hoo inno comin
    • Her idden comin



    but I would place these expressions to the respective region of G.B. and I found only that
    • She bain't coming - is spoken in the westcountry (is it true?)
    • Hoo inno coming - is a rural dialect... BUT WHERE?
    • her idden comin - where is it spoken?


    Also,what are the differences between
    • she's not coming
    • she isn't coming
    • She ain't coming

    ???

    Thanks for your answers!
    "She bain't comin'" looks like west country English, it's a shortened form of "She be not coming". There is a tendency in west country dialects to use "be" instead of "is" and "are". I can't say I recognise the other examples.
    "She's not coming", "She isn't coming" and "She ain't coming" all mean the same. "Ain't" is considered uneducated though.

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: help me to place dialects

    I think that more of us "ain't" than will admit it. Especially for emphasis. Example:
    .
    I ain't going, and you can't make me.
    .
    Of course, I could be wrong, but I tend to think that those who never say "ain't" may be in the same category as those who never swear.


  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: help me to place dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    I think that more of us "ain't" than will admit it. Especially for emphasis. Example:
    .
    I ain't going, and you can't make me.
    .
    Of course, I could be wrong, but I tend to think that those who never say "ain't" may be in the same category as those who never swear.

    Well I bloody well don't use ain't. And I don't bloody swear, neither.

    On a slightly more serious note, I have to disagree with your first point, at least as far as I am concerned. I don't know any reasonably educated speakers of Southern BrE who use ain't except jokingly, or in such expressions as, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". I know that we drop our aitches more than we admit, and that we say (not write) wanna and gotta, but not ain't.

    Incidentally, I find it interesting that we bother to put the apostrophe in the written form as if it were the contraction of ai(n) not.

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    #5

    Re: help me to place dialects

    Well, I said I could be wrong. (I am often wrong. ) (Darn, I left a word out again. )


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    #6

    Re: help me to place dialects

    This page suggests that hoo is an archaic pronoun used in the Derbyshire dialect. I grew up in a neighbouring county and can't say I heard it used.

    Accents and dialects of the UK

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    #7

    Re: help me to place dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    This page suggests that hoo is an archaic pronoun used in the Derbyshire dialect. I grew up in a neighbouring county and can't say I heard it used.

    Accents and dialects of the UK
    Following leads from that page, I came across one (which I have now lost, sorry) suggesting that her also is/was used as a subject pronoun in Derby.

    When I worked in Exeter in the mid 1970s, I frequently heard 'er and 'e used as subject pronouns; if I recall correctly, they were used for all genders.

    I feel that idden for isn't is not uncommon in many parts of England.

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    #8

    Re: help me to place dialects

    A follow-up to my last post.

    Since I read the OP I have used idden in conversations with several native speakers, including a couple of teachers, in both negative statements and question tags. Immediately after completing the utterance, I have asked people what they think they have heard. Answers vary between innit and isn't it. Nobody so far has heard idden it. This is a very unscientific way of suggesting that it might be more common than we realise.

    My pronunciation has been close to /IdnIt/, with a syllabic /n/

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    #9

    Re: help me to place dialects

    Thank you for your answers!

    Peter Trudgill in The dialects of England (1994) talk about traditional dialects and he did these examples to explain how a dialect is different from standard english, and you are really helpfull for me because, obviously, not beeing an english speaker I can't understand very well the differences and especially set these sentences with the respective regional dialect.

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    #10

    Re: help me to place dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Following leads from that page, I came across one (which I have now lost, sorry) suggesting that her also is/was used as a subject pronoun in Derby.

    When I worked in Exeter in the mid 1970s, I frequently heard 'er and 'e used as subject pronouns; if I recall correctly, they were used for all genders.
    It's not confined to Derby; I've heard it used around the Midlands.

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