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    #1

    Present Perfect

    Hi guys,
    considering the following sentence:
    What I have seen of you has greatly pleased but even more puzzled me
    I have a couple of questions:
    1) is there a way of telling the difference between past and present perfect as for PUZZED (Im rather talking in general terms)
    2) I HAVE SEEN - does it receive EXPERIENTIAL (EXISTENTIAL) READING? If you know what I mean.
    3) the verbal phrases HAS PLEASED and PUZZLED - do they express activities being simultaneous with that of I HAVE SEEN or do they express present result, i.e. IM PLEASED and PUZZLED now?
    Thank you

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    #2

    Re: Present Perfect

    Ask Raymott on the use of Past and Present Perfect, he's the expert. I think:
    Past Perfect: I had puzzled. You are no longer puzzled, or you've given up puzzling.
    Present Perfect: I have puzzled. You are still puzzled, or you have an answer or a possible answer.
    I have seen the pyramids. 'see' can take an object, the thing seen, and is therefore experiential. 'be' 'exist' and many other verbs cannot have objects which are not their subjects, and are existential.
    'He has pleased me' This contains no information about whether or not you remain pleased.
    'He has pleased me, but now I dislike him.'
    'He has pleased me and continues to do so.'

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    #3

    Re: Present Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    ... 'be' 'exist' and many other verbs cannot have objects which are not their subjects, ...
    Of what use is this comment?
    Neither of these verbs is capable of taking an object in any case.

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