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    #1

    the use or courtship

    I 'am not sure how to use the noun courtship and the verb court.

    Can I say:

    1) He makes me the courtship

    2) he courts me

    Otherwise could anybody suggest me the right form to use courtship and court?

    Thank's

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the use or courtship

    Quote Originally Posted by Arara View Post
    I 'am not sure how to use the noun courtship and the verb court.

    Can I say:

    1) He makes me the courtship No

    2) he courts me ~ Highly unlikely.

    Otherwise could anybody suggest me the right form to use courtship and court?

    Thank's
    Both noun and verb are old-fashioned now, so I wouldn't bother with them if I were you, but I have given you one example of each.

    Soames courted her for a long time before she finally agreed to marry him.


    Their courtship was interrupted by the war
    .

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: the use or courtship

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Both noun and verb are old-fashioned now, so I wouldn't bother with them if I were you, but I have given you one example of each.

    Soames courted her for a long time before she finally agreed to marry him.


    Their courtship was interrupted by the war
    .
    It's true that it's old fashioned but I like it, it's rather poetic. Incidentally, in colloquial Irish English the word "court" has a rather different but related meaning, "Mary and Sťamus are behind the bike sheds havin' a court".

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    #4

    Re: the use or courtship

    Here's an example of the poetic use of the word. (about 1:03)

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    #5

    Re: the use or courtship

    How would it be a modern term to say court/ courtship?
    Could I use flirt/flirting to express the same meaning?

    Thank's

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    #6

    Re: the use or courtship

    Quote Originally Posted by Arara View Post
    How would it be a modern term to say court/ courtship?
    Could I use flirt/flirting to express the same meaning?

    Thank's
    You could say "He flirts with me", I suppose it would be the modern way to express it but for me it doesn't have the same elegance or romance as "He courts me".

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    #7

    Re: the use or courtship

    Quote Originally Posted by Arara View Post
    How would it be a modern term to say court/ courtship?
    Could I use flirt/flirting to express the same meaning?

    Thank's
    ***** NOT ***** A ***** TEACHER *****


    Arara,


    If I were you, I would say "He is courting me" or (preferably)

    "We are dating" or "We are going steady."

    Today in the United States, one must be very careful with

    language involving romance. For example, a person could

    lose his/her job if another worker complains to the

    manager: "He/she is flirting with me." Many employees are

    terrified of saying anything. If a man says, "You're wearing

    a nice dress today," a woman might consider that "flirting"

    and file a sexual harassment charge.

    Thank you

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: the use or courtship

    There isn't really a modern term, because the thing itself doesn't exist any more.

    When it existed originally, it was the time when a man sought to persuade a woman that he was worthy of her attentions, with the hope that ultimately she would accept a proposal of marriage.

    Henry courted Mary throughout the summer.

    Then, perhaps after the First World War, it became used for the time when couples were spending time together in what was perceived by all to be a relationship that would lead to a proposal and marriage.

    Arthur and Agnes are courting. It won't be long before he pops the question.

    By the late 1960s it was becoming more common for couples to enjoy a romantic relationship without necessarily thinking of marriage, and very soon after that it became less socially unacceptable for couples to live togetherwithout being married.

    Nowadays we have such expressions as:

    I am seeing Mabel = I have some sort of relationship with her that is more than just normal friendship.

    I am going out with George.
    This is perhaps a little farther along the road to romance, but not necessarily.

    Pete and Mary are an item = Their relationship is well established.


    There are many other expressions, but none, I feel, that really means the same as court.

    I should add that I am well past the age of 'going out' with anybody. Younger members may be able to contribute more up-to-date expressions to describe their frivolities.

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    #9

    Re: the use or courtship

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    There are many other expressions, but none, I feel, that really means the same as court.
    woo?

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    #10

    Re: the use or courtship

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    woo?
    Like courting (business), the word woo (politics) is still used, but I feel that it is old-fashioned in the romantic sense.

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