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    #1

    Someone else's

    Is there an adjective meaning "someone else's" or "other's" in English?

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    #2

    Re: Someone else's

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Is there an adjective meaning "someone else's" or "other's" in English?
    I can't think of one. Is there one in Polish?

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    #3

    Re: Someone else's

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I can't think of one. Is there one in Polish?
    Yes, "cudzy". (And it's not pronounced /kʌdzi/. )

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    #4

    Re: Someone else's

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Yes, "cudzy". (And it's not pronounced /kʌdzi/. )
    Well, I've tried nearly every Polish-English dictionary on the net, as you must have done, and they haven't come up with anything that inspires me.

    I suppose we could use another's, but it sounds stilted to me:

    No pupil may open another's desk.

    And that would really work only if we assume that the another is another pupil.

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    #5

    Re: Someone else's

    That's exactly the problem. It's irritating how irresponsible the makers of bilingual dictionaries are. It seems a bad idea to use one as a learner.

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    #6

    Re: Someone else's

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    That's exactly the problem. It's irritating how irresponsible the makers of bilingual dictionaries are. It seems a bad idea to use one as a learner.
    I don't agree that the makers of bilingual dictionaries are irresponsible. The leading publishers do a pretty good job. The problem is the way that people misuse them.

    If you were talking about online dictionaries which claim to give the 'right' ot 'best' definitions, then I agree with you.

    I wholeheartedly agree with you about learners and bilingual dictionaries. But then I feel that no learner should be allowed near any dictionary without proper instruction on how to use dictionaries.

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    #7

    Re: Someone else's

    I meant the online dictionaries. I don't remember when I last used a paper one and hence my mistake. The problem with online bilingual dictionaries is that there is no good way of using them sometimes. They don't bother to tell you which translation is good for which meaning and they arbitrarily choose the meanings to translate.

    It's a little bit better when it comes to the paper editions. They're made more carefully but still it's mostly the word/translation scheme. It can't be good.

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    #8

    Re: Someone else's

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I meant the online dictionaries. I don't remember when I last used a paper one and hence my mistake. The problem with online bilingual dictionaries is that there is no good way of using them sometimes. They don't bother to tell you which translation is good for which meaning and they arbitrarily choose the meanings to translate. I agree.

    It's a little bit better when it comes to the paper editions. They're made more carefully but still it's mostly the word/translation scheme. It can't be good. I don't use small dictionaries, so I don't know what they are like these days (they used to be useless). However, most desk editions that I have used have been vey good at giving words in context in phrases and sentences. Some add helpful usage notes.
    5

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    #9

    Re: Someone else's

    This is one area where you get what you pay for.

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