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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,618
    #1

    was a ... , but now

    I was a soldier, but now I'm a teacher.
    I've been a soldier, but now I'm a teacher.

    Do both sentences mean 'I used to be a soldier, but now I'm a teacher' and work as well?

    Thank you in advance.

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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 1,121
    #2

    Re: was a ... , but now

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    I was a soldier, but now I'm a teacher.
    I've been a soldier, but now I'm a teacher.
    They mean you are no longer a soldier but a teacher. The difference between the two sentences is the closeness of the time of your discharge from the army to the speaker's now. With the present perfect, quitting the army has some present relevance (has just happened recently).
    Last edited by corum; 27-Nov-2010 at 08:05.

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