Results 1 to 2 of 2

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    "father to four"

    In class today I was using a Martin Luther King biography to teach the passive. Here's my question: several of the students got stumped on "Martin Luther King Jr. was father to four." They didn't understand why "to" wasn't followed by a verb and I couldn't explain it to them. I know we use other expressions like "party to s.t." and "witness to s.t" etc.

    Does anyone have a clear, simple explanation? I've browsed through the forums, but nothing that might be an answer caught my eye.

    Thanks much!!
    Leikela

  1. lauralie2's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 758
    #2

    Re: "father to four"

    Quote Originally Posted by leikela View Post
    In class today I was using a Martin Luther King biography to teach the passive. Here's my question: several of the students got stumped on "Martin Luther King Jr. was father to four." They didn't understand why "to" wasn't followed by a verb and I couldn't explain it to them. I know we use other expressions like "party to s.t." and "witness to s.t" etc.

    Does anyone have a clear, simple explanation? I've browsed through the forums, but nothing that might be an answer caught my eye.

    Thanks much!!
    Leikela
    In that context, 'to' is a preposition, like 'of' in father of four.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •