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    #1

    Do I need comma ?

    Hi all,

    Do I need to put comma between sleep and hoping ?

    Quickly and quietly, Maria, a young girl, went to sleep hoping to please her mom

    Does comma between sleep hoping make any meaning difference ?

    Many thanks

  1. Senior Member
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    #2

    Re: Do I need comma ?

    /A learner/

    Quote Originally Posted by duiter View Post
    Hi all,

    Do I need to put comma between sleep and hoping ?

    Quickly and quietly, Maria, a young girl, went to sleep hoping to please her mom

    Does comma between sleep hoping make any meaning difference ?

    Many thanks
    "Maria went to sleep hoping to please her mom."
    I think that "hoping to please her mom" is an adverb to sleep.
    No need for a comma between a verb and its adverb.

    Let's wait for a teacher confirmation/denying.

  2. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Do I need comma ?

    Quote Originally Posted by duiter View Post
    Hi all,

    Do I need to put comma between sleep and hoping ?

    Quickly and quietly, Maria, a young girl, went to sleep hoping to please her mom

    Does comma between sleep hoping make any meaning difference ?

    Many thanks
    With participial phrases like "hoping to please her mom", a comma is used to disambiguate, like this:


    1. Maria saw the woman using binoculars.
    2. Maria saw the woman, using binoculars.


    In 1., the woman is using binoculars, and in 2., Maria is using them. The comma stops the participial phrase (using binoculars) from modifying the preceding noun (woman).

    Your example sentence does not admit ambiguity, so a comma is unnecessary:


    • Maria went to sleep hoping to please her mom.

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    #4

    Re: Do I need comma ?

    Hi there,
    I guess there is no need for any comma. Here we have the combination of two sentences where the subject of both verbs "went to sleep" and "hoping" is the same, so no need for a comma.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Do I need comma ?

    I think the comma does change the meaning.
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 27-Nov-2010 at 20:04. Reason: Correction

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