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    #1

    fuddy-duddy

    What is the noun for 'old'?

    Thank you.
    I have looked it up, but I failed to get a correct answer. Maybe, you could help me out.

  1. jerry081958's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: fuddy-duddy

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    What is the noun for 'old'?

    Thank you.
    I have looked it up, but I failed to get a correct answer. Maybe, you could help me out.
    It would depend on the sentence and the context, Panicmonger. Fuddy-duddy has a connotation of being old-fashioned and not up-to-date or savvy to the latest fashion or technology. Other possibilities:

    elder - positive
    senior citizen - positive to neutral
    codger - an often mildly eccentric and usually elderly fellow
    the old man - phrase for someone's husband, boyfriend, father, or boss; to some people, it's not respectful; to some, it doesn't have a negative connotation

    So, please give us a sentence with some more of an idea of what you're trying to communicate. Thanks!

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    #3

    Re: fuddy-duddy

    You can also use the word 'old' itself, in a form of ellipsis.

    "The old are getting tired" (a bit of an older form, perhaps less common)

    another example, "the rich are complaining"

    in both cases, the true meaning is people.

    "The old people are getting tired"

    "the rich people are complaining"

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    #4

    Re: fuddy-duddy

    The term older people is being used nowadays as a form that is meant to be more polite than old or elderly, or so I was told when I attended a lecture on the subject of ageing societies a couple of years ago.

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