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      • Native Language:
      • Czech
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    • Join Date: Nov 2010
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    #1

    Continuative

    Hi,
    I wondered whether "I HAVENīT GROWN FOR/ IN A YEAR" receives the CONTINUATIVE READING (I didnīt grow and I still donīt do)

    as for the second question is the use of either FOR or IN a matter of BrE/AmE or do these two carry a difference in meaning - this is just my idea but I feel that FOR tells us about an uninterrupted state of someone not growing at all during this period (being the same height)
    while IN means that during the period there was not even one occasion on which the personīs height would change.

    What do you think?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: Continuative

    Quote Originally Posted by Kudla View Post
    Hi,
    I wondered whether "I HAVENīT GROWN FOR/ IN A YEAR" receives the CONTINUATIVE READING (I didnīt grow and I still donīt do)

    as for the second question is the use of either FOR or IN a matter of BrE/AmE or do these two carry a difference in meaning - this is just my idea but I feel that FOR tells us about an uninterrupted state of someone not growing at all during this period (being the same height)
    while IN means that during the period there was not even one occasion on which the personīs height would change.

    What do you think?
    It doesn't say anything about a continuing state, it says that for the period of one year, up until this moment you haven't grown. I would use "for" and I am British.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: Continuative

    Thanks for you comment!
    What I basically meant to say by the continuative reading (state, if you wish, though, it could also be a repetitive habit) was that it tells us about a past action that still holds at the present - for affirmative answers this is clearly understandable:
    I have lived here for 3 years now
    but even negative answers can receive this reading (thatīs what some highly acclaimed grammarians say):
    Itīs 3 months now that I havenīt had a car
    - this, of course, doesnīt talk about a past action that didnīt happen - it doesnīt convey the message: It didnīt happen in the past that I would have a car for at least one second (or sth) but it talks about a state and so it can be paraphrased as:
    "The situation of my doing without a car started three months ago and is still continuing"
    Nevertheless, this is to be distinguished from:
    The suicide attackers left the country soon after the bomb they had hidden didnīt explode - here we clearly talk about a past action that didnīt actualise and this non-actualisation is treated as an action in its own way - cannot be regarded as continuative
    In this respect, could the sentence about GROWING be considered as an example of the continuative reading as well?

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