Results 1 to 10 of 10
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 269
    #1

    disc vs. disk

    Hello everybody!

    Opinions are welcome as to the use of the forms "disc" and "disk" in AmE and BrE. Any country-specific differences?

    Thanks

  1. Amigos4's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 54,931
    #2

    Re: disc vs. disk

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack8rkin View Post
    Hello everybody!

    Opinions are welcome as to the use of the forms "disc" and "disk" in AmE and BrE. Any country-specific differences?

    Thanks
    Refer to Spelling of disc - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia for additional insight.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 269
    #3

    Re: disc vs. disk

    "By the 20th century, the c-spelling was more popular in British English, while the k-spelling was preferred in American English."

    It seems to be tru even now. Am I right?

  2. Amigos4's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 54,931
    #4

    Re: disc vs. disk

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack8rkin View Post
    "By the 20th century, the c-spelling was more popular in British English, while the k-spelling was preferred in American English."

    It seems to be true even now. Am I right?
    Apparently, there are some technical differences associated with the meanings of 'disk' and 'disc' that apply to both sides of the Atlantic. According to the following URL: What's the difference between a "disc" and a "disk?" , A disc refers to optical media, such as an audio CD, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, DVD-RAM, or DVD-Video disc. All discs are removable, meaning when you unmount or eject the disc from your desktop or Finder, it physically comes out of your computer.
    A disk refers to magnetic media, such as a floppy disk, the disk in your computer's hard drive, an external hard drive. Disks are always rewritable unless intentionally locked or write-protected.
    Disks are usually sealed inside a metal or plastic casing (often, a disk and its enclosing mechanism are collectively known as a "hard drive").

    Thank you for asking your questions! I was not aware of the technical differences before I did some research on the subject.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 269
    #5

    Re: disc vs. disk

    Thank you for your help.
    Still the use of "с" and "k" is ambiguous and confusing to me.
    Just try the first link you gave me and find in the "References":
    "Compact disk". The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language. Bartleby.com. 2000. http://www.bartleby.com/61/16/C0521600.html.

    It's "Compact DISK", and yes it's optical.

    What I see of all the above is that Americans mostly like "k" in the "disk".

    Here seems to be no general rule, just trends...

    Hence, personal opinions are still welcome. What do you personally write in the word "disc/disk"? "C" or "K"?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,910
    #6

    Re: disc vs. disk

    In BrE, we mostly use -c, but in IT, American spelling is often used, so we watch a TV programme and use a computer program, so disk is often used for magnetic storage. I haven't seen Compact Disk used much in BrE.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,104
    #7

    Re: disc vs. disk

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos4 View Post
    Apparently, there are some technical differences associated with the meanings of 'disk' and 'disc' that apply to both sides of the Atlantic. According to the following URL: What's the difference between a "disc" and a "disk?" , A disc refers to optical media, such as an audio CD, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, DVD-RAM, or DVD-Video disc. All discs are removable, meaning when you unmount or eject the disc from your desktop or Finder, it physically comes out of your computer.
    A disk refers to magnetic media, such as a floppy disk, the disk in your computer's hard drive, an external hard drive. Disks are always rewritable unless intentionally locked or write-protected.
    Disks are usually sealed inside a metal or plastic casing (often, a disk and its enclosing mechanism are collectively known as a "hard drive").

    Thank you for asking your questions! I was not aware of the technical differences before I did some research on the subject.
    I'd be prepared to say that many of these descriptions are bollocks. There might be some difference in the history of the way the two words are used, but when you get argumentation like the following, you have to wonder:

    "A person may want to use the hard K "disk" when forming compound nouns, such as a "disk holder," in order to avoid an awkward soft C pronunciation by the reader."
    What is the Difference Between a Disc and a Disk?

    For the benefit of non-native speakers (and apparently for some natives) the two words are pronounced identically.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #8

    Re: disc vs. disk



    Here is the official CD logo. So Americans tend to use "c" with compact discs, but "k" with computer disks (or diskettes).

  4. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #9

    Re: disc vs. disk

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack8rkin View Post
    Thank you for your help.
    Still the use of "с" and "k" is ambiguous and confusing to me.
    Just try the first link you gave me and find in the "References":
    "Compact disk". The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language. Bartleby.com. 2000. http://www.bartleby.com/61/16/C0521600.html.

    It's "Compact DISK", and yes it's optical.
    ...
    Maybe so, but the lawyers wouldn 't like it! CDs and CD-ROMS have a 'C'. Read the packaging.

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 269
    #10

    Re: disc vs. disk

    Oh yes! They sure would not like it ;)

    Ok, thank you.

    After reading all your messages and links you shared, the situation is more or less clear to me now. Thank you again.

Similar Threads

  1. CD , platter or disk
    By Over the top in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Jun-2010, 19:58

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •