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    #1

    much / much of?

    I thought 'much' and 'much of' are used in a very similar way. But one day I wrote a sentence "It requires too much sacrifice" and the proofreader corrected it into "too much of sacrifice" So I realized these two aren't always working the same way. Could you tell me some cases and the when only much (or much of) must be used, plus the reason for that?
    Can I say like "I've got much of time" ?
    Thank you in advance, teachers

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    #2

    Re: much / much of?

    Quote Originally Posted by zzang418lee View Post
    I thought 'much' and 'much of' are used in a very similar way. But one day I wrote a sentence "It requires too much sacrifice" and the proofreader corrected it into "too much of sacrifice" So I realized these two aren't always working the same way. Could you tell me some cases and the when only much (or much of) must be used, plus the reason for that?
    Can I say like "I've got much of time" ?
    Thank you in advance, teachers

    NOT A TEACHER


    Zzang,


    I have checked Mr. Michael Swan's very popular Practical English

    Usage, my dictionaries, and the Web. I may have an answer.

    (1) I most respectfully suggest that you are correct and that

    the proofreader "accidentally" made a mistake.

    (2) I believe that it is good English to say either:

    (a) This job requires sacrifice. (sacrifice used as an uncountable

    noun)

    (b) This job requires a sacrifice. (sacrifice used as a countable

    noun)

    (3) If you wish to add "too much," you would then get:

    This job requires too much sacrifice./ This job requires too much

    of a sacrifice.

    (i) Mr. Swan points out that we may use "much of" before a

    determiner (such as "a" or "the"). His examples:

    You can't see much of a country in a week.

    How much of the house do you want to paint?


    THANK YOU & HAVE A NICE DAY


    P.S. Our wonderful Mr. Swan also has an answer to your last question.

    His example:

    I haven't got much time. (He adds that "much" is usually used in

    questions and in the negative. A lot of is more natural in the

    affirmative. So I guess you should say:

    I've got a lot of time. / I have a lot of time.)

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: much / much of?

    But the proof-reader may have been justified, in the unlikely case of a list starting with 'it requires...', and made of words that do and don't take 'of'. So both these would be acceptable:

    1 It requires too much effort, determination to do the right thing, and sacrifice.

    2 It requires too much of an effort, of a determination to do the right thing, and of sacrifice

    b

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    #4

    Re: much / much of?

    But not, Bob, too much of effort. which was what the proofreader wanted. As Parser so politely expressed it: "the proofreader "accidentally" made a mistake. "

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: much / much of?

    The proofreader wanted 'too much of sacrifice'. I was saying that 'of sacrifice' might sometimes be justified by its position (which obviously was not the case here - where I agree with TP's polite diagnosis!)

    b

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    #6

    Re: much / much of?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    The proofreader wanted 'too much of sacrifice'. I was saying that 'of sacrifice' might sometimes be justified by its position (which obviously was not the case here - where I agree with TP's polite diagnosis!)
    Sorry if I am being obtuse, Bob, but in your previous post you wrote, " It requires too much of an effort" (my emphasis added). Did you mean to omit 'an'? If not, I don't see the point of what you were saying there.

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    #7

    Re: much / much of?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Sorry if I am being obtuse, Bob, but in your previous post you wrote, " It requires too much of an effort" (my emphasis added). Did you mean to omit 'an'? If not, I don't see the point of what you were saying there.
    No - quod scripsi scripsi! My point was that 'of sacrifice' could be justified (in a case that I said was 'unlikely'*), and from this point my example was the work of my own whimsy! It obviously did not apply to the words quoted, but I thought it at least conceivable that the account of the proof-reader's malfeasance suppressed an elision between 'required' and 'of'. When I'm told someone made a mistake I like to suspend judgment until I've tested the facts. (I think this conversation has more than outstayed its welcome! )

    b

    PS *I toyed with the words 'very/most unlikely', but thought that was going a bit too far.
    Last edited by BobK; 06-Dec-2010 at 16:43. Reason: Added PS

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