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  1. hai_lua_t2's Avatar
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    #1

    What's the difference between "eat" and "have"?

    Please explain for me the difference between "eat" and "have".
    Thanks!

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What's the difference between "eat" and "have"?

    Quote Originally Posted by hai_lua_t2 View Post
    Please explain for me the difference between "eat" and "have".
    Thanks!
    I suppose you mean "eat lunch" as opposed to "have lunch". In BrE we tend to say "I am going to have lunch". I think that Americans tend to say "I am going to eat lunch". However, some people may say it differently and I am not absolutely sure about AmE. In any case, they both mean the same.

  3. devonpham1998's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: What's the difference between "eat" and "have"?

    (Just a recommendation, no sure!)
    Using "have lunch" is more formal, I think so. Anyway, when you communicate with English people, you should use "have lunch". You should just say "eat lunch" when you are talking to your close friends or your family's members.

    Devon

  4. devonpham1998's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What's the difference between "eat" and "have"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    I don't know if there are any "hard" rules about this is AmE. It probably depends on the area one is in. Several things come to mind in this context:
    I'm going to Joe's cafe for lunch.
    I'm going to Joe's cafe to eat lunch.
    I'm going to Joe's cafe to have lunch.
    And the once trendy, I'm going to Joe's cafe to do lunch.
    When I read those sentences, I have feelings like:
    The first one, is like an answer for kinda question: "Why do you go to Joe's cafe?".
    The second one, seems like a task: "11 a.m go to Joe's cafe to eat lunch."
    The third one, a simple sentence to say to someone, maybe your friend, what you are going to do: "Hey, I'm going to Joe's cafe to have lunch. Bye!"
    And the last one, totally weird for me but, I think using this when you have to eat lunch, you have to do it always. LOL. This one should say with a tired voice, or angry also.
    Well, please leave me comments. What do you think?

  5. devonpham1998's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: What's the difference between "eat" and "have"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    You may be reading too much into these statements. These are simple statements stating your plans. For example, "I am going on a cruise next summer."
    Oh, now I understand. Thank you!

    Devon

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