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    #1

    whole

    Can you please tell me about the difference between these two sentences?:

    The whole of Europe is aware of this situation

    The whole Europe is aware of this situation

    Thank you very much

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    #2

    Re: whole

    The first is correct; the second is ungrammatical.

    They both need a full stop.

    Rover

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    #3

    Re: whole

    Thank you for your answer but can you tell me if there is a grammatical rule or if it is a question of use. Whatever may help me understand it.

    But you may say:

    "The whole city was burning" or "The whole London is expecting you".

    On the other hand if you choose the expression "the whole of", it normally comes before articles, possissives, etc.

    "The whole of this confusion" or "the whole of the time".

    So, why not "The whole of the Europe is aware of this problem" or "The whole Europe is aware of this problem" ?

    Thank you again.

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    #4

    Re: whole

    Quote Originally Posted by ratóncolorao View Post
    Thank you for your answer but can you tell me if there is a grammatical rule or if it is a question of use. Whatever may help me understand it.

    But you may say:

    "The whole city was burning" or "The whole London is expecting you".

    On the other hand if you choose the expression "the whole of", it normally comes before articles, possissives, etc.

    "The whole of this confusion" or "the whole of the time".

    So, why not "The whole of the Europe is aware of this problem" or "The whole Europe is aware of this problem" ?

    Thank you again.
    The whole can prefix only a singular, countable common noun, thus e.g.

    The whole house needed repainting.

    but not

    *The whole houses need repainting.
    (plural noun)

    *The whole coffee was delicious.
    (noncount noun)

    *The whole London is in turmoil.
    (proper noun)

    A proper noun, however, can be prefixed by the whole of, e.g.

    The whole of London is in turmoil.

    and plural nouns can be prefixed by whole alone, e.g.

    Whole books have been written on this subject.


    Note, however, that, 'whole books' means 'entire/complete books', and not 'all (the) books', whereas the whole house could - albeit rather unnaturally - be rephrased as all (of) the house, and the whole of London as all London.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: whole

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    ...
    *The whole houses need repainting.
    (plural noun)[I]
    ....
    In current Br English this would sound odd, if not wrong. We say 'All the houses'.

    b

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    #6

    Re: whole

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    In current Br English this would sound odd, if not wrong. We say 'All the houses'.

    b
    Precisely, hence the asterisk denoting unacceptability....


  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: whole

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    Precisely, hence the asterisk denoting unacceptability....

    Sorry - misread.

    b

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    #8

    Re: whole

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Sorry - misread.

    b
    Forgiven!

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