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    #1

    Plus, conjuction or prep?

    If you don't know or are not a teacher, please do not respond. Thanks

    I am just confused, becuase according to MerriamWebster it can be both, American Heritage dictionary calls it a conjunction and other sites say it can only be a preposition.

    What is the right way?

    Seems to me like a conjunction since when hearing people talk and using it, they alwasy use it like 'and'. Same as in math, 2 and 3 is five, or 2 plus 3 is five.

    please explain, I am not an english major, so simple is good.

    THanks

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    #2

    Re: Plus, conjuction or prep?

    The three criteria for central prepositions are:

    They cannot have as a complement:
    (i) a that-clause
    (ii) an infinitive clause
    (iii) a subjective case form of a personal pronoun

    There will be five people: two adults running plus/and three children walking.

    Prepositions have no capacity for conjoining predications. This 'plus' in the example sentence above has.


    I think originally he wanted two things: to support his family plus/and to answer the burning question about Indian origins.

    Central prepositions cannot have as a complement:
    (ii) an infinitive clause
    -----

    Two and two is five.
    Five pounds is not enough.

    The grammatical concord will not support those in favor of the prep. reading.

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    #3

    Re: Plus, conjuction or prep?

    Ummm, that is over my head? Did anyone look at the examples given by different dictionaries?

    Here you go. This is what I am asking. Which way is plus? Conjunction or Preposition?

    This site says it can be both:
    Plus - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

    This site says it can only be a conjunction:
    plus - Dictionary definition and pronunciation - Yahoo! Education

    Thankyou

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    #4

    Re: Plus, conjuction or prep?


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    #5

    Re: Plus, conjuction or prep?

    Corum, is what you are saying that 'plus' is a conjunction. The more I read your response, I think I get it.

    What you are saying is that in your example, the word 'plus' breaks the traditional rules for a central preposition. Like you said:

    "There will be five people: two adults running plus/and three children walking.
    Prepositions have no capacity for conjoining predications. This 'plus' in the example sentence above has."


    Since it is like that, that makes it not a preposition but a conjunction, correct?

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    #6

    Re: Plus, conjuction or prep?

    Yes. '(P)lus' does not satisfy the grammatical criteria for a (central) preposition in certain structures.

    Quirk et. al., 1985, p.667:

    9.8.Marginal prepositions

    Less, minus, plus, times, and over form a special group in their use with
    numerals (cf 6.68), eg:
    6 + 2 is read as 'six plus two'.
    In informal style, minus and plus can also occur in nonnumerical contexts:

    I hope he comes minus his wife. ['without'] -- preposition
    She's had mumpsplus measles. ['and'] -- conjunction

    Plus can even be used as a conjunction:
    You can get what you want, plus you can save money.
    It says it can be both depending on the meaning, thus the term "marginal" in "marginal preposition".

    Plus is a marginal preposition. Sometimes it is a prep.; sometimes it is a linker; but never both.


    I am not motivated to adopt the Quirkian way of thinking. Quirk is not a mathematician; I am not a linguist.
    Last edited by corum; 08-Dec-2010 at 19:13.

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    #7

    Re: Plus, conjuction or prep?

    I think the status of 'plus' is indeterminate in

    Two plus two equals four.
    Two and two is four -- conj
    Two with/added to two is four. -- prep

    However, the status of 'plus' is obvious here:

    You can get what you want, plus you can save money.

    '(P)lus' here conjoins two independent clauses, which makes it a coordinator.

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    #8

    Re: Plus, conjuction or prep?

    Corum, thanks for the info. I agree, seems like from looking at different sources that 'plus' can be sometimes a conjunction, and sometimes a preposition.

    But at the same time, you and I both know, math is different, and it many times goes by a different set of rules. So I am not going to read into this too much. I am going to accept that two plus two is four well means (two and two together makes four) and it is a way of implicity stating the number four.

    And in the end, that is what matters, that i understand that, and I can do it. So for what is worth, I willl just accept that 'plus' can be both a conjunction and preposition. Just like other parts of speech can be more than one type.

    So Thankyou, i get it now

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